Hypercalcaemia and metabolic alkalosis with betel nut chewing

Emphasis on its integrative pathophysiology

Shih Hua Lin, Yuh Feng Lin, Surinder Cheema-Dhadli, Mogamat Razeen Davids, Mitchell L. Halperin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Events in the gastrointestinal tract that might contribute to a high absorption of calcium were simulated in vitro to evaluate why only a small proportion of individuals who ingest alkaline calcium salts develop hypercalcaemia, hypokalaemia and metabolic alkalosis. Methods. A patient who chewed and swallowed around 40 betel nuts daily developed hypercalcaemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypokalaemia with renal potassium wasting, and renal insufficiency. The quantities of calcium and alkali per betel nut preparation were measured. Factors that might increase intestinal absorption of calcium were evaluated. Results. Hypercalcaemia in the index case was accompanied by a high daily calcium excretion (248 mg, 6.2 mmol). Circulating levels of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and parathyroid hormone were low. Hypokalaemia with a high transtubular K+ concentration gradient, metabolic alkalosis, a low excretion of phosphate and a very low glomerular filtration rate were prominent features. Conclusions. Possible explanations for the pathophysiology of metabolic alkalosis and hypokalaemia are provided. We speculate that a relatively greater availability of ionized calcium than inorganic phosphate in the lumen of the intestinal tract could have enhanced dietary calcium absorption.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)708-714
Number of pages7
JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Volume17
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Areca
Alkalosis
Mastication
Hypercalcemia
Hypokalemia
Calcium
Dietary Calcium
Calcitriol
Intestinal Absorption
Alkalies
Parathyroid Hormone
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Renal Insufficiency
Gastrointestinal Tract
Potassium
Salts
Phosphates
Kidney

Keywords

  • Bicarbonate
  • Calcium
  • Hypokalaemia
  • Milk-alkali syndrome
  • Phosphate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Hypercalcaemia and metabolic alkalosis with betel nut chewing : Emphasis on its integrative pathophysiology. / Lin, Shih Hua; Lin, Yuh Feng; Cheema-Dhadli, Surinder; Davids, Mogamat Razeen; Halperin, Mitchell L.

In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Vol. 17, No. 5, 2002, p. 708-714.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, Shih Hua ; Lin, Yuh Feng ; Cheema-Dhadli, Surinder ; Davids, Mogamat Razeen ; Halperin, Mitchell L. / Hypercalcaemia and metabolic alkalosis with betel nut chewing : Emphasis on its integrative pathophysiology. In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. 2002 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 708-714.
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