High prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection in patients with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

Ming Huang Chen, Liang Tsai Hsiao, Tzeon Jye Chiou, Jin Hwang Liu, Jyh Pyng Gau, Hao Wei Teng, Wei Shu Wang, Ta Chung Chao, Chueh Chuan Yen, Po Min Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several reports recently found that patients with B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) had a higher carrier rate of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). The current study aimed to examine the hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection status of NHL patients in Taiwan, an HBV-endemic area. Serum HBV and serum hepatitis C virus were measured in 471 NHL patients and 1,013 non-lymphoma cancer patients enrolled between February 2000 and March 2007. Furthermore, nested polymerase chain reaction of HBV-DNA was used to examine the sera from selected patients in these two populations and healthy volunteers for the presence of occult HBV infection. The infection rates (as indicated by the rates of HBsAg and occult HBV) were compared between different groups. There was a higher incidence of HBV infection in B cell NHL patients (23.5%), especially patients with diffuse large B lymphoma, than solid tumor patients (15.6%, P = 0.001). Among HbsAg-negative patients, those with B cell NHL had a higher prevalence of occult HBV infection (6%) than those with non-lymphoma solid tumors and healthy volunteers, 0% and 0.9%, respectively (P = 0.005). B cell NHL patients, even HBsAg-negative B cell NHL patients, but not T cell NHL patients, have a higher incidence of HBV infection than patients with solid tumors. Our findings support the etiologic role of HBV infection in B cell NHL.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)475-480
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Hematology
Volume87
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hepatitis B virus
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Occult hepatitis B

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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