High normotension is associated with higher metabolic syndrome risk in postmenopausal women

Chun Hsien Hsu, Jiunn Diann Lin, Chung Ze Wu, Shu Chuen Lau, Yen Lin Chen, Sai Hung Tang, Shu Man Yu, Dee Pei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Cardiovascular disease and diabetes are important causes for mortality in older people. Both hypertension and prehypertension are correlated with them. Recently, health promotion and disease prevention in postmenopausal women have become an essential issue of public health policy. The present study aimed to evaluate whether the harmful effects of blood pressure (BP) could still be found in normotensive postmenopausal women (below 120/80mmHg). Methods: A total of 4539 normotensive postmenopausal women aged 51years or older, undergoing routine health examinations, were enrolled in the cross-sectional analyses. To mitigate the effect of age on BP, participants within the same age were divided into tertiles according to their systolic BP (SBP). Then, participants in the low-SBP tertile of each age stratum were pooled together to form a larger group (low-normal SBP group [LNSBP]). Similarly, the middle- and high-normal SBP were grouped accordingly (MNSBP and HNSBP). Metabolic syndrome (MetS) was considered to be a surrogate for future cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Results: The study showed that HNSBP bore a higher likelihood of having abnormal MetS components, elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and a higher odds ratio (1.46; 95% confidence interval 1.17-1.81) for having MetS than LNSBP. In contrast, age, body mass index, fasting plasma glucose and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly related to SBP in multiple regression analysis. Conclusions: The risk of having MetS was significantly associated with higher SBP even within normotension. Primary prevention, such as lifestyle modification, and more strict control of BP should be stressed in postmenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-300
Number of pages8
JournalGeriatrics and Gerontology International
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Blood Pressure
Disease
chronic illness
LDL Cholesterol
Cardiovascular Diseases
Group
Prehypertension
hypertension
social stratum
Lipoprotein(a)
health policy
health promotion
Primary Prevention
Public Policy
Health Policy
regression analysis
Health Promotion
mortality
public health
confidence

Keywords

  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Normotension
  • Postmenopausal women
  • Preventive geriatrics
  • Primary prevention

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

High normotension is associated with higher metabolic syndrome risk in postmenopausal women. / Hsu, Chun Hsien; Lin, Jiunn Diann; Wu, Chung Ze; Lau, Shu Chuen; Chen, Yen Lin; Tang, Sai Hung; Yu, Shu Man; Pei, Dee.

In: Geriatrics and Gerontology International, Vol. 14, No. 2, 2014, p. 293-300.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsu, Chun Hsien ; Lin, Jiunn Diann ; Wu, Chung Ze ; Lau, Shu Chuen ; Chen, Yen Lin ; Tang, Sai Hung ; Yu, Shu Man ; Pei, Dee. / High normotension is associated with higher metabolic syndrome risk in postmenopausal women. In: Geriatrics and Gerontology International. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 293-300.
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