Hierarchical cleavage of focal adhesion kinase by caspases alters signal transduction during apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

Johannes Grossmann, Monika Artinger, Adam W. Grasso, Hsing Jien Kung, Jürgen Schölmerich, Claudio Fiocchi, Alan D. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background & Aims: Purified intestinal epithelial cells die of detachment-induced apoptosis due to loss of cell anchorage during isolation. Anchorage-dependent cells form focal adhesions, sites of enhanced cell-matrix attachment that confer survival signals. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a component of the focal adhesion signaling complex, transduces these antiapoptotic signals. In this report, the molecular events leading to cleavage of FAK by caspases during apoptosis and its functional implications are defined. Methods: Cytosolic extracts of human intestinal epithelial cells undergoing detachment-induced apoptosis were analyzed by Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and kinase assay. Results: FAK is cleaved by the ordered proteolytic activity of 2 different members of the caspase-3 family. The first cleavage is mediated by caspase-3, generating a 94/92-kilodalton-terminal fragment, which is processed by caspase-6 to an 84-kilodalton fragment. After apoptosis is initiated, the level of FAK phosphorylation is rapidly decreased, and the phosphorylation pattern of FAK-associated proteins is dramatically modified, showing significant yet divergent changes in signal transduction. Conclusions: Cleavage of FAK during apoptosis of normal human cells is an example of the sequential, highly regulated, and coordinate action of caspases that not only dismantle a cell by proteolysis, but also alter the cell's signaling machinery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-88
Number of pages10
JournalGastroenterology
Volume120
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Caspases
Signal Transduction
Epithelial Cells
Apoptosis
Focal Adhesions
Caspase 3
Caspase 6
Phosphorylation
Immunoprecipitation
Proteolysis
Phosphotransferases
Western Blotting
Survival
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Hierarchical cleavage of focal adhesion kinase by caspases alters signal transduction during apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. / Grossmann, Johannes; Artinger, Monika; Grasso, Adam W.; Kung, Hsing Jien; Schölmerich, Jürgen; Fiocchi, Claudio; Levine, Alan D.

In: Gastroenterology, Vol. 120, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 79-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grossmann, Johannes ; Artinger, Monika ; Grasso, Adam W. ; Kung, Hsing Jien ; Schölmerich, Jürgen ; Fiocchi, Claudio ; Levine, Alan D. / Hierarchical cleavage of focal adhesion kinase by caspases alters signal transduction during apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. In: Gastroenterology. 2001 ; Vol. 120, No. 1. pp. 79-88.
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