Hepatitis C and G virus infections in polytransfused children

J. L. Chung, J. H. Kao, M. S. Kong, C. P. Yang, I. J. Hung, T. Y. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) and a newly identified hepatitis G virus (HGV) and their clinical significance were studied in 42 polytransfused Taiwanese children. Serological assays for antibodies against HCV (anti-HCV) and polymerase chain reaction for serum HCV ribonucleic acid (RNA) and HGV RNA were performed. The prevalence of anti-HCV and HGV RNA was 17% and 14%, respectively in 42 polytransfused children Anti-HCV seropositives had a significantly higher mean age, peak serum transaminase level, and longer transfusion duration than seronegatives, while children with HGV infection usually had no or only mild hepatitis activities. The prevalence of anti-HCV dropped sharply after implementation of anti-HCV screening, however the prevalence of HGV viraemia remained unchanged. Conclusion: HGV infection is not uncommon in polytransfused Taiwanese children and the virus does not cause significant hepatitis compared to HCV infection. Current blood donor screening for anti-HCV can effectively protect polytransfused children from HCV infection but the impact of additional screening for HGV markers awaits further studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)546-549
Number of pages4
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume156
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

GB virus C
Virus Diseases
Hepacivirus
Hepatitis C Antibodies
RNA
Hepatitis
Donor Selection
Viremia
Transaminases
Blood Donors
Serum
Viruses
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Hepatitis G virus
  • Thalassaemic children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Hepatitis C and G virus infections in polytransfused children. / Chung, J. L.; Kao, J. H.; Kong, M. S.; Yang, C. P.; Hung, I. J.; Lin, T. Y.

In: European Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 156, No. 7, 1997, p. 546-549.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, J. L. ; Kao, J. H. ; Kong, M. S. ; Yang, C. P. ; Hung, I. J. ; Lin, T. Y. / Hepatitis C and G virus infections in polytransfused children. In: European Journal of Pediatrics. 1997 ; Vol. 156, No. 7. pp. 546-549.
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