Greater white matter hyperintensities and the association with executive function in suicide attempters with late-life depression

Chemin Lin, Chih Mao Huang, Helmet T. Karim, Ho Ling Liu, Tatia Mei Chun Lee, Changwei W. Wu, Cheng Hong Toh, Yun Fang Tsai, Tzung Hai Yen, Shwu Hua Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Late-life depression (LLD) is associated with greater risk of suicide and white matter hyperintensities (WMH), which are also found in suicide attempters regardless of age. Greater periventricular WMH are related to worse cognitive function. We investigated the spatial distribution of WMH in suicide attempters with LLD and its association with cognitive function. We recruited 114 participants with LLD (34 with history of suicide attempt and 80 without) and 47 older adult controls (individuals without LLD or history of suicide attempt). WMH were quantified by an automated segmentation algorithm and were classified into different regions. Suicide attempters with LLD had significantly higher global WMH (F3, 150 = 2.856, p = 0.039) and periventricular WMH (F3, 150 = 3.635, p = 0.014) compared to other groups. Suicide attempters with high WMH had significantly lower executive function, which could be an underlying mechanism for cognitive decline in older adults with suicidality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-67
Number of pages8
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume103
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • Cognitive function
  • Late-life depression
  • Periventricular white matter hyperintensity
  • Suicide
  • White matter hyperintensity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Ageing
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

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