Abstract

Soccer is one of the world's most popular sports, in which players must sometimes use their unprotected heads in offense or defense. In recent years, controversy surrounding the long-term effects of repeated impacts from heading has raised attention from the medical community. Previous works using numerical simulation studied the responses of the human brain during American football-related concussion. This study aims to estimate the response of the human brain to soccerheading impacts using the finite element method. A validated full-body human model was used to analyze the impact simulation. The soccer ball flew with a translational velocity of 6 m/s or a rotational velocity of 30 rad/s. Players usually hit the ball with their foreheads or tops of heads while heading. Acceleration, Head Injury Criterion, principal strain, principal strain rate and shear stress of white matters in the brain are compared among different headings. The head motion during heading increases the acceleration of the brain during heading. The back spin of the ball increases its shear stress and strain rate during heading. When a moving player heads a ball with back spinning, the risk of mild traumatic brain injury may be high. This study shows that high strain and strain rate concentrate around the corpus callosum and shift from the impact site to the opposite direction. This observation is similar to those gathered from previous studies that simulated concussions sustained during American football.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIFMBE Proceedings
PublisherSpringer Verlag
Pages118-119
Number of pages2
Volume47
ISBN (Print)9783319122618
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering, GCBME 2014 and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, APCMBE 2014 - Tainan, Taiwan
Duration: Oct 9 2014Oct 12 2014

Other

Other1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering, GCBME 2014 and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, APCMBE 2014
CountryTaiwan
CityTainan
Period10/9/1410/12/14

Fingerprint

Brain
Strain rate
Shear stress
Shear strain
Sports
Finite element method
Computer simulation

Keywords

  • Brain
  • Concussion
  • Finite Element
  • Heading
  • Soccer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Bioengineering

Cite this

Chen, P. Y., Chou, L. S., Hu, C-J., Chen, H-H., & Chen, H. H. (2015). Finite element simulations of brain responses to soccer-heading impacts. In IFMBE Proceedings (Vol. 47, pp. 118-119). Springer Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11128-5_33

Finite element simulations of brain responses to soccer-heading impacts. / Chen, Po Yueh; Chou, L. S.; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chen, Hsiang-Ho; Chen, Hsiang Ho.

IFMBE Proceedings. Vol. 47 Springer Verlag, 2015. p. 118-119.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chen, PY, Chou, LS, Hu, C-J, Chen, H-H & Chen, HH 2015, Finite element simulations of brain responses to soccer-heading impacts. in IFMBE Proceedings. vol. 47, Springer Verlag, pp. 118-119, 1st Global Conference on Biomedical Engineering, GCBME 2014 and 9th Asian-Pacific Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering, APCMBE 2014, Tainan, Taiwan, 10/9/14. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11128-5_33
Chen PY, Chou LS, Hu C-J, Chen H-H, Chen HH. Finite element simulations of brain responses to soccer-heading impacts. In IFMBE Proceedings. Vol. 47. Springer Verlag. 2015. p. 118-119 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11128-5_33
Chen, Po Yueh ; Chou, L. S. ; Hu, Chaur-Jong ; Chen, Hsiang-Ho ; Chen, Hsiang Ho. / Finite element simulations of brain responses to soccer-heading impacts. IFMBE Proceedings. Vol. 47 Springer Verlag, 2015. pp. 118-119
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