Family leisure and subjective well-being: Do patterns and timing matter?

Chen Yueh Chen, Yi Hsiu Lin, Chen Yin Lee, Yen Kuang Lin, Wen Ing Chen, Jing Rong Shih

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined the relationship between family leisure and subjective well-being by exploring the type and timing of family leisure activities. We used convenience sampling to recruit 711 adolescents, and conducted a hierarchical linear regression and one-way analysis of variance for data analysis. Results showed that participants who were more involved in a high number of either core or balance family leisure activities had higher subjective well-being. In addition, participants (vs. their counterparts involved in few core or balance family leisure activities) highly involved in both core and balance family leisure activities had higher subjective well-being. Further, participants (vs. all their counterparts) involved in the fewest family leisure activities all year round had lower subjective well-being. These results implied that participants’ subjective well-being was correlated with patterns and timing of family leisure. Education practitioners and parents should be aware that subjective well-being can be improved by appropriate allocation of time spent on different types of family leisure activities.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere8396
JournalSocial Behavior and Personality
Volume47
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • Family functioning
  • Family leisure
  • Family leisure activities
  • Recreation activities
  • Subjective well-being

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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