Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support may be a lifesaving modality in patients with burn and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome: Experience of Formosa Water Park dust explosion disaster in Taiwan

Yu Jen Chiu, Hsu Ma, Wen Chieh Liao, Yu Chung Shih, Mei Chun Chen, Chun Che Shih, Tai Wei Chen, Cherng Kang Perng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been reported to improve outcomes in patients with refractory respiratory failure. These successful experiences have stimulated interest in using ECMO as a potential therapy for patients with acute pulmonary failure resulting from burn and inhalation lung injury. Current literature has supported the use of ECMO in critically-ill, pediatric burn patients. On the other hand, it is controversial to apply ECMO in adult burn patients, and the evidence is limited by the shortcomings of small sample size. We share our successful experience of ECMO treatment in the casualties of the Formosa Water Park Dust Explosion Disaster. Methods: We investigated the data from the dust explosion event, which happened on June 27, 2015, in New Taipei, Taiwan. The medical records of five patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving ECMO were evaluated. Results: The mean study subject age was 21.8 years, with a mean total body surface area burned of 82.9%. The average time to ECMO setup was 48.6 days. Survivors and non-survivors averaged four days and 77.7 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 40%. Three survivors were discharged without any ECMO-related complications or pulmonary sequelae after one year of follow up. Conclusions: ECMO may be a lifesaving modality for burn patients with severe lung injury who are nonresponsive to maximal medical management, especially for young patients with early ECMO intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-123
Number of pages6
JournalBurns
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Explosions
Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Disasters
Dust
Taiwan
Water
Lung Injury
Survivors
Inhalation Burns
Lung
Body Surface Area
Critical Illness
Respiratory Insufficiency
Sample Size
Medical Records
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • Burn
  • Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support may be a lifesaving modality in patients with burn and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome : Experience of Formosa Water Park dust explosion disaster in Taiwan. / Chiu, Yu Jen; Ma, Hsu; Liao, Wen Chieh; Shih, Yu Chung; Chen, Mei Chun; Shih, Chun Che; Chen, Tai Wei; Perng, Cherng Kang.

In: Burns, Vol. 44, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 118-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{5a0b7f7410644f3e9dcc0fbaa0743a39,
title = "Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support may be a lifesaving modality in patients with burn and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome: Experience of Formosa Water Park dust explosion disaster in Taiwan",
abstract = "Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been reported to improve outcomes in patients with refractory respiratory failure. These successful experiences have stimulated interest in using ECMO as a potential therapy for patients with acute pulmonary failure resulting from burn and inhalation lung injury. Current literature has supported the use of ECMO in critically-ill, pediatric burn patients. On the other hand, it is controversial to apply ECMO in adult burn patients, and the evidence is limited by the shortcomings of small sample size. We share our successful experience of ECMO treatment in the casualties of the Formosa Water Park Dust Explosion Disaster. Methods: We investigated the data from the dust explosion event, which happened on June 27, 2015, in New Taipei, Taiwan. The medical records of five patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving ECMO were evaluated. Results: The mean study subject age was 21.8 years, with a mean total body surface area burned of 82.9{\%}. The average time to ECMO setup was 48.6 days. Survivors and non-survivors averaged four days and 77.7 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 40{\%}. Three survivors were discharged without any ECMO-related complications or pulmonary sequelae after one year of follow up. Conclusions: ECMO may be a lifesaving modality for burn patients with severe lung injury who are nonresponsive to maximal medical management, especially for young patients with early ECMO intervention.",
keywords = "Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Burn, Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation",
author = "Chiu, {Yu Jen} and Hsu Ma and Liao, {Wen Chieh} and Shih, {Yu Chung} and Chen, {Mei Chun} and Shih, {Chun Che} and Chen, {Tai Wei} and Perng, {Cherng Kang}",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.burns.2017.06.013",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "118--123",
journal = "Burns",
issn = "0305-4179",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support may be a lifesaving modality in patients with burn and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

T2 - Experience of Formosa Water Park dust explosion disaster in Taiwan

AU - Chiu, Yu Jen

AU - Ma, Hsu

AU - Liao, Wen Chieh

AU - Shih, Yu Chung

AU - Chen, Mei Chun

AU - Shih, Chun Che

AU - Chen, Tai Wei

AU - Perng, Cherng Kang

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been reported to improve outcomes in patients with refractory respiratory failure. These successful experiences have stimulated interest in using ECMO as a potential therapy for patients with acute pulmonary failure resulting from burn and inhalation lung injury. Current literature has supported the use of ECMO in critically-ill, pediatric burn patients. On the other hand, it is controversial to apply ECMO in adult burn patients, and the evidence is limited by the shortcomings of small sample size. We share our successful experience of ECMO treatment in the casualties of the Formosa Water Park Dust Explosion Disaster. Methods: We investigated the data from the dust explosion event, which happened on June 27, 2015, in New Taipei, Taiwan. The medical records of five patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving ECMO were evaluated. Results: The mean study subject age was 21.8 years, with a mean total body surface area burned of 82.9%. The average time to ECMO setup was 48.6 days. Survivors and non-survivors averaged four days and 77.7 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 40%. Three survivors were discharged without any ECMO-related complications or pulmonary sequelae after one year of follow up. Conclusions: ECMO may be a lifesaving modality for burn patients with severe lung injury who are nonresponsive to maximal medical management, especially for young patients with early ECMO intervention.

AB - Background: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) has been reported to improve outcomes in patients with refractory respiratory failure. These successful experiences have stimulated interest in using ECMO as a potential therapy for patients with acute pulmonary failure resulting from burn and inhalation lung injury. Current literature has supported the use of ECMO in critically-ill, pediatric burn patients. On the other hand, it is controversial to apply ECMO in adult burn patients, and the evidence is limited by the shortcomings of small sample size. We share our successful experience of ECMO treatment in the casualties of the Formosa Water Park Dust Explosion Disaster. Methods: We investigated the data from the dust explosion event, which happened on June 27, 2015, in New Taipei, Taiwan. The medical records of five patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving ECMO were evaluated. Results: The mean study subject age was 21.8 years, with a mean total body surface area burned of 82.9%. The average time to ECMO setup was 48.6 days. Survivors and non-survivors averaged four days and 77.7 days, respectively. The overall mortality rate was 40%. Three survivors were discharged without any ECMO-related complications or pulmonary sequelae after one year of follow up. Conclusions: ECMO may be a lifesaving modality for burn patients with severe lung injury who are nonresponsive to maximal medical management, especially for young patients with early ECMO intervention.

KW - Acute respiratory distress syndrome

KW - Burn

KW - Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85026266612&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85026266612&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.burns.2017.06.013

DO - 10.1016/j.burns.2017.06.013

M3 - Article

C2 - 28756973

AN - SCOPUS:85026266612

VL - 44

SP - 118

EP - 123

JO - Burns

JF - Burns

SN - 0305-4179

IS - 1

ER -