Evaluating the effects of immunosuppression by in-vivo bioluminescence imaging after allotransplantation of ovarian grafts

Yi Hsin Lin, Yu Chi Yeh, Chii Ruey Tzeng, Wei Jen Shang, Jah Yao Liu, Chi Huang Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has been introduced for studies of ongoing biological processes but has never been applied for ovarian transplantation. Here, BLI was used as a novel approach to trace the survival of ovarian grafts. The ovarian donors were transgenic mice carrying FVB/N-Tg (PolII-luc) as a reporter gene, encoding luciferase to catalyse luciferin which results in visible light emission as bioluminescence. There were three groups of recipients: (i) group A: BALB/c mice without immunosuppressant treatment; (ii) group B: BALB/c mice receiving a cocktail immunosuppressant treatment; and (iii) group C: immunodeficient NOD-SCID mice without immunosuppression. Luciferin BLI was used to follow graft survival, and viable follicle numbers were counted as a measure of success. Bioluminesence intensity fluctuated but was consistent with the end-point counts of viable follicle numbers. Group A showed loss of viable follicles and bioluminesence disappeared as early as day 10 following ovarian engraftment, indicating strong immune rejection. Groups B and C showed graft survival and measurable bioluminesence for up to 30 days. In conclusion, BLI provided non-invasive longitudinal dynamic monitoring of ovarian grafts with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. This approach should prove valuable for research on ovarian transplantation. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) has been introduced for studies of ongoing biological processes but has never been applied for ovarian transplantation. Here, we used BLI as a novel approach to trace the survival of ovarian grafts. The ovarian donors were transgenic mice carrying FVB/N-Tg (PolII-luc) as a reporter gene encoding luciferase to catalyse luciferin, resulting in visible light emission as bioluminescence. There were three groups of recipients: group A, BALB/c mice without immunosuppressant treatment; group B, BALB/c mice receiving a cocktail immunosuppressant treatment and group C, immunodeficient NOD-SCID mice without immunosuppression. Luciferin BLI was used to follow engrafted tissue survival, and viable follicle numbers were counted as a measure of success. We found that bioluminescence intensity fluctuated but was consistent with the end-point counts of viable follicle numbers. Group A showed loss of viable follicles, and bioluminescence disappeared as early as the 10th day following ovarian engraftment, indicating strong immune rejection. Groups B and C showed graft survival and measurable BLI for up to 30 days. In conclusion, BLI provided non-invasive longitudinal dynamic monitoring of ovarian grafts with excellent sensitivity and spatial resolution. This approach should prove valuable for research on ovarian transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)220-227
Number of pages8
JournalReproductive BioMedicine Online
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Graft Survival
Immunosuppression
Immunosuppressive Agents
Transplants
Transplantation
Biological Phenomena
Inbred NOD Mouse
SCID Mice
Luciferases
Reporter Genes
Transgenic Mice
Light
Tissue Survival
Therapeutics
Research

Keywords

  • bioluminescence imaging
  • ovarian transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Evaluating the effects of immunosuppression by in-vivo bioluminescence imaging after allotransplantation of ovarian grafts. / Lin, Yi Hsin; Yeh, Yu Chi; Tzeng, Chii Ruey; Shang, Wei Jen; Liu, Jah Yao; Chen, Chi Huang.

In: Reproductive BioMedicine Online, Vol. 22, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 220-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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