Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to test whether Er:YAG laser-etched enamel of human teeth could act as a biologically active scaffold for tissue regeneration. Background data: Hydroxylapatite (HA) with rough surface created by acid etching treatment has been used as a scaffold for tissue engineering. However, whether tooth HA can be a scaffold for osteoblastic cell seeding is still unclear. Materials and methods: Enamel samples from human teeth were pretreated with an Er:YAG laser to create a rough surface. Then the surface of the laser-treated enamel was examined using a surface roughness profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. In addition, static water contact angles of the Er:YAG laser-treated enamel samples were measured using goniometry. To observe the effects of cell behavior on an Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel surface, we cultured MG63 osteoblast-like cells on the surface-modified enamel samples. Alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of cell proliferation and differentiation, was monitored and compared with that in untreated control and acid-etched enamel samples. Results: Er:YAG laser treatment significantly improved the surface roughness of the enamel samples. Furthermore, MG63 osteoblast-like cells cultured on the Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel surface expressed more alkaline phosphatase activity and exhibited greater degrees of cellular differentiation than did cells that had been cultured on untreated enamel samples. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel promotes osteoblastic differentiation. This finding suggests that Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel surfaces can potentially serve as a scaffold for tissue engineering.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)516-522
Number of pages7
JournalPhotomedicine and Laser Surgery
Volume30
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Enamels
Solid-State Lasers
Dental Enamel
Lasers
Tooth
Osteoblasts
Phosphatases
Durapatite
Tissue Engineering
Scaffolds (biology)
Tissue engineering
Scaffolds
Alkaline Phosphatase
Cell Differentiation
Surface roughness
Tissue Scaffolds
Tissue regeneration
Acids
Cell proliferation
Contact angle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Er : YAG Laser-roughened enamel promotes osteoblastic differentiation. / Teng, Nai Chia; Wang, Peter Da Yun; Chang, Wei Jen; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Fan, Kang Hsin; Lin, Che Tong; Hsieh, Sung Chih; Huang, Haw Ming.

In: Photomedicine and Laser Surgery, Vol. 30, No. 9, 01.09.2012, p. 516-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study was to test whether Er:YAG laser-etched enamel of human teeth could act as a biologically active scaffold for tissue regeneration. Background data: Hydroxylapatite (HA) with rough surface created by acid etching treatment has been used as a scaffold for tissue engineering. However, whether tooth HA can be a scaffold for osteoblastic cell seeding is still unclear. Materials and methods: Enamel samples from human teeth were pretreated with an Er:YAG laser to create a rough surface. Then the surface of the laser-treated enamel was examined using a surface roughness profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. In addition, static water contact angles of the Er:YAG laser-treated enamel samples were measured using goniometry. To observe the effects of cell behavior on an Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel surface, we cultured MG63 osteoblast-like cells on the surface-modified enamel samples. Alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of cell proliferation and differentiation, was monitored and compared with that in untreated control and acid-etched enamel samples. Results: Er:YAG laser treatment significantly improved the surface roughness of the enamel samples. Furthermore, MG63 osteoblast-like cells cultured on the Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel surface expressed more alkaline phosphatase activity and exhibited greater degrees of cellular differentiation than did cells that had been cultured on untreated enamel samples. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel promotes osteoblastic differentiation. This finding suggests that Er:YAG laser-roughened enamel surfaces can potentially serve as a scaffold for tissue engineering.",
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AU - Huang, Haw Ming

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