Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in polycystic ovary syndrome: Implications for the genesis of cardiovascular diseases

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, is characterized by hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Women with PCOS have a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanisms underlying these risks are unclear. Human peripheral blood contains circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from bone marrow that have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, which may contribute to vessel homeostasis and repair. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia, which may result in EPC dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms of EPC dysfunction in PCOS, which possibly result in a higher genesis of CVDs in PCOS-affected subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-213
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Fertility and Sterility
Volume6
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2013

Fingerprint

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Cardiovascular Diseases
Insulin Resistance
Hyperandrogenism
Hyperinsulinism
Dyslipidemias
Homeostasis
Endothelial Cells
Bone Marrow
Endothelial Progenitor Cells

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Endothelial
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome
  • Progenitor cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

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abstract = "Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, is characterized by hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Women with PCOS have a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanisms underlying these risks are unclear. Human peripheral blood contains circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from bone marrow that have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, which may contribute to vessel homeostasis and repair. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia, which may result in EPC dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms of EPC dysfunction in PCOS, which possibly result in a higher genesis of CVDs in PCOS-affected subjects.",
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AU - Chiu, Wan-Chun

AU - Hsu, Ming-I

AU - Chen, Yi-Jen

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AB - Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disorder affecting women of reproductive age, is characterized by hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance. Women with PCOS have a higher risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and endothelial dysfunction. The mechanisms underlying these risks are unclear. Human peripheral blood contains circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) derived from bone marrow that have the ability to proliferate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, which may contribute to vessel homeostasis and repair. PCOS is associated with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, and dyslipidemia, which may result in EPC dysfunction. In this review, we summarize the potential mechanisms of EPC dysfunction in PCOS, which possibly result in a higher genesis of CVDs in PCOS-affected subjects.

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