Endometriosis increased the risk of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis: A population-based study

Chia Chang Wu, Shiu Dong Chung, Herng Ching Lin

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Previous studies have suggested an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and endometriosis. However, no nation-wide population study has yet reported an association between them. In this study, we examined the risk of BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis during a 3-year follow-up in Taiwan using a population-based dataset. Study Design: This study comprised 9191 subjects with endometriosis, and 27573 subjects randomly selected as controls. We individually followed-up each subject (n=36764) for a 3-year period to identify subjects subsequently diagnosed with BPS/IC. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was employed to estimate the risk of subsequent BPS/IC following a diagnosis of endometriosis. Results: Incidences of BPS/IC during the 3-year follow-up period was 0.2% and 0.05% for subjects with and without endometriosis, respectively. The hazard ratio for developing BPS/IC over a 3-year period for subjects with endometriosis compared to subjects without endometriosis was 4.43 (95% CI: 2.13-9.23). After adjusting for co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, hyperlipidemia, chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraines, sicca syndrome, allergies, endometriosis, asthma, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse, the Cox proportional hazards regressions revealed that the hazard ratio for BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis was 3.74 (95% CI=1.76-7.94, P<0.001) compared to that in controls. Conclusions: This study provides epidemiological evidence of an association between endometriosis and a subsequent diagnosis of BPS/IC.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Interstitial Cystitis
Endometriosis
Urinary Bladder
Pain
Population
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Pelvic Pain
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Panic Disorder
Sjogren's Syndrome
Tobacco Use
Hyperlipidemias
Migraine Disorders
Taiwan
Proportional Hazards Models
Chronic Pain
Alcoholism
Coronary Disease
Epidemiologic Studies
Hypersensitivity

Keywords

  • Bladder
  • Endometriosis
  • Interstital cystitis
  • Pelvic pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Urology

Cite this

@article{f0a3620eb976411db1490ecbf4f55131,
title = "Endometriosis increased the risk of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis: A population-based study",
abstract = "Objective: Previous studies have suggested an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and endometriosis. However, no nation-wide population study has yet reported an association between them. In this study, we examined the risk of BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis during a 3-year follow-up in Taiwan using a population-based dataset. Study Design: This study comprised 9191 subjects with endometriosis, and 27573 subjects randomly selected as controls. We individually followed-up each subject (n=36764) for a 3-year period to identify subjects subsequently diagnosed with BPS/IC. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was employed to estimate the risk of subsequent BPS/IC following a diagnosis of endometriosis. Results: Incidences of BPS/IC during the 3-year follow-up period was 0.2{\%} and 0.05{\%} for subjects with and without endometriosis, respectively. The hazard ratio for developing BPS/IC over a 3-year period for subjects with endometriosis compared to subjects without endometriosis was 4.43 (95{\%} CI: 2.13-9.23). After adjusting for co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, hyperlipidemia, chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraines, sicca syndrome, allergies, endometriosis, asthma, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse, the Cox proportional hazards regressions revealed that the hazard ratio for BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis was 3.74 (95{\%} CI=1.76-7.94, P<0.001) compared to that in controls. Conclusions: This study provides epidemiological evidence of an association between endometriosis and a subsequent diagnosis of BPS/IC.",
keywords = "Bladder, Endometriosis, Interstital cystitis, Pelvic pain",
author = "Wu, {Chia Chang} and Chung, {Shiu Dong} and Lin, {Herng Ching}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/nau.23462",
language = "English",
journal = "Neurourology and Urodynamics",
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T1 - Endometriosis increased the risk of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis

T2 - A population-based study

AU - Wu, Chia Chang

AU - Chung, Shiu Dong

AU - Lin, Herng Ching

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Objective: Previous studies have suggested an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and endometriosis. However, no nation-wide population study has yet reported an association between them. In this study, we examined the risk of BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis during a 3-year follow-up in Taiwan using a population-based dataset. Study Design: This study comprised 9191 subjects with endometriosis, and 27573 subjects randomly selected as controls. We individually followed-up each subject (n=36764) for a 3-year period to identify subjects subsequently diagnosed with BPS/IC. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was employed to estimate the risk of subsequent BPS/IC following a diagnosis of endometriosis. Results: Incidences of BPS/IC during the 3-year follow-up period was 0.2% and 0.05% for subjects with and without endometriosis, respectively. The hazard ratio for developing BPS/IC over a 3-year period for subjects with endometriosis compared to subjects without endometriosis was 4.43 (95% CI: 2.13-9.23). After adjusting for co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, hyperlipidemia, chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraines, sicca syndrome, allergies, endometriosis, asthma, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse, the Cox proportional hazards regressions revealed that the hazard ratio for BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis was 3.74 (95% CI=1.76-7.94, P<0.001) compared to that in controls. Conclusions: This study provides epidemiological evidence of an association between endometriosis and a subsequent diagnosis of BPS/IC.

AB - Objective: Previous studies have suggested an association between bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) and endometriosis. However, no nation-wide population study has yet reported an association between them. In this study, we examined the risk of BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis during a 3-year follow-up in Taiwan using a population-based dataset. Study Design: This study comprised 9191 subjects with endometriosis, and 27573 subjects randomly selected as controls. We individually followed-up each subject (n=36764) for a 3-year period to identify subjects subsequently diagnosed with BPS/IC. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was employed to estimate the risk of subsequent BPS/IC following a diagnosis of endometriosis. Results: Incidences of BPS/IC during the 3-year follow-up period was 0.2% and 0.05% for subjects with and without endometriosis, respectively. The hazard ratio for developing BPS/IC over a 3-year period for subjects with endometriosis compared to subjects without endometriosis was 4.43 (95% CI: 2.13-9.23). After adjusting for co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease, obesity, hyperlipidemia, chronic pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, panic disorder, migraines, sicca syndrome, allergies, endometriosis, asthma, tobacco use, and alcohol abuse, the Cox proportional hazards regressions revealed that the hazard ratio for BPS/IC among subjects with endometriosis was 3.74 (95% CI=1.76-7.94, P<0.001) compared to that in controls. Conclusions: This study provides epidemiological evidence of an association between endometriosis and a subsequent diagnosis of BPS/IC.

KW - Bladder

KW - Endometriosis

KW - Interstital cystitis

KW - Pelvic pain

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