Elevated erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase activity is a novel clinical marker in hyperventilation syndrome

Ying Hock Teng, Hsiu Ting Tsai, Yih Shou Hsieh, Yi Chen Chen, Chiao Wen Lin, Meng Chih Lee, Long Yau Lin, Shun Fa Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity in patients with hyperventilation syndrome. Methods: A total of 71 patients with hyperventilation syndrome and 60 controls were recruited in this study for measurement of the erythrocyte CA activity. CA activity was analyzed from erythrocyte using CA esterase activity analysis. Results: The erythrocyte CA activity was significantly elevated in the patients with hyperventilation syndrome compared to controls (31.07±1.37 U/g Hb vs. 24.67±0.99 U/g Hb, p=0.003). The standardized β value and significant R2 value of total CA activity for prediction of hyperventilation was 0.155 (p=0.016) and 0.024, respectively. Moreover, a significant negative correlation was found between total CA activity and partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) (r=-0.185, p=0.03, n=131). Furthermore, the adjusted odds ratios for patients with hyperventilation were 11.6 (95% CI: 4.8-27.9) and 51.0 (95% CI: 5.8-445.2) for individuals with either PaCO2≤28.1 mm Hg or CA activity ≥29.71 U/g hemoglobin (Hb), and for individuals with both PaCO2≤28.1 mm Hg and CA activity ≥29.71 U/g Hb, respectively, compared to individuals with both PaCO 2>28.1 mm Hg and CA activity

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)441-445
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase activity
  • Hyperventilation syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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