Electronic cigarette use among high school students and its association with cigarette use and smoking cessation, North Carolina youth tobacco surveys, 2011 and 2013

Li Ling Huang, Sarah D. Kowitt, Erin L. Sutfin, Tanha Patel, Leah M. Ranney, Adam O. Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Although adolescent cigarette use continues to decline in the United States, electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among adolescents has escalated rapidly. This study assessed trends and patterns of e-cigarette use and concurrent cigarette smoking and the relationships between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation intentions and behaviors among high school students in North Carolina. Methods Data came from high school students who completed the schoolbased, cross-sectional North Carolina Youth Tobacco Survey in 2011 (n = 4,791) and 2013 (n = 4,092). This study assessed changes in prevalence of e-cigarette and cigarette use from 2011 through 2013, and cessation-related factors associated with those students' current and past use of e-cigarettes in 2013. Results The prevalence of current e-cigarette use (use in the past 30 days) significantly increased from 1.7% (95% CI, 1.3%-2.2%) in 2011 to 7.7% (95% CI, 5.9%-10.0%) in 2013. Among dual users, current e-cigarette use was negatively associated with intention to quit cigarette smoking for good (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.29-0.87) and with attempts to quit cigarette smoking in the past 12 months (RRR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.49-0.97). Current ecigarette smokers were less likely than those who only smoked cigarettes to have ever abstained from cigarette smoking for 6 months (RRR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82) or 1 year (RRR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.09-0.51) and to have used any kind of aids for smoking cessation (RRR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.74). Conclusion Public health practitioners and cessation clinic service providers should educate adolescents about the risks of using any nicotinecontaining products, including e-cigarettes, and provide adequate tobacco cessation resources and counseling to adolescent tobacco users.

Original languageEnglish
Article number150564
JournalPreventing chronic disease
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Smoking Cessation
Tobacco
Tobacco Products
Smoking
Students
Odds Ratio
Tobacco Use Cessation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Electronic Cigarettes
Counseling
Public Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Electronic cigarette use among high school students and its association with cigarette use and smoking cessation, North Carolina youth tobacco surveys, 2011 and 2013. / Huang, Li Ling; Kowitt, Sarah D.; Sutfin, Erin L.; Patel, Tanha; Ranney, Leah M.; Goldstein, Adam O.

In: Preventing chronic disease, Vol. 13, No. 8, 150564, 01.01.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Electronic cigarette use among high school students and its association with cigarette use and smoking cessation, North Carolina youth tobacco surveys, 2011 and 2013",
abstract = "Introduction Although adolescent cigarette use continues to decline in the United States, electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among adolescents has escalated rapidly. This study assessed trends and patterns of e-cigarette use and concurrent cigarette smoking and the relationships between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation intentions and behaviors among high school students in North Carolina. Methods Data came from high school students who completed the schoolbased, cross-sectional North Carolina Youth Tobacco Survey in 2011 (n = 4,791) and 2013 (n = 4,092). This study assessed changes in prevalence of e-cigarette and cigarette use from 2011 through 2013, and cessation-related factors associated with those students' current and past use of e-cigarettes in 2013. Results The prevalence of current e-cigarette use (use in the past 30 days) significantly increased from 1.7{\%} (95{\%} CI, 1.3{\%}-2.2{\%}) in 2011 to 7.7{\%} (95{\%} CI, 5.9{\%}-10.0{\%}) in 2013. Among dual users, current e-cigarette use was negatively associated with intention to quit cigarette smoking for good (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.51; 95{\%} CI, 0.29-0.87) and with attempts to quit cigarette smoking in the past 12 months (RRR = 0.69; 95{\%} CI, 0.49-0.97). Current ecigarette smokers were less likely than those who only smoked cigarettes to have ever abstained from cigarette smoking for 6 months (RRR = 0.42; 95{\%} CI, 0.21-0.82) or 1 year (RRR = 0.21; 95{\%} CI, 0.09-0.51) and to have used any kind of aids for smoking cessation (RRR = 0.46; 95{\%} CI, 0.29-0.74). Conclusion Public health practitioners and cessation clinic service providers should educate adolescents about the risks of using any nicotinecontaining products, including e-cigarettes, and provide adequate tobacco cessation resources and counseling to adolescent tobacco users.",
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AU - Huang, Li Ling

AU - Kowitt, Sarah D.

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AU - Ranney, Leah M.

AU - Goldstein, Adam O.

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N2 - Introduction Although adolescent cigarette use continues to decline in the United States, electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among adolescents has escalated rapidly. This study assessed trends and patterns of e-cigarette use and concurrent cigarette smoking and the relationships between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation intentions and behaviors among high school students in North Carolina. Methods Data came from high school students who completed the schoolbased, cross-sectional North Carolina Youth Tobacco Survey in 2011 (n = 4,791) and 2013 (n = 4,092). This study assessed changes in prevalence of e-cigarette and cigarette use from 2011 through 2013, and cessation-related factors associated with those students' current and past use of e-cigarettes in 2013. Results The prevalence of current e-cigarette use (use in the past 30 days) significantly increased from 1.7% (95% CI, 1.3%-2.2%) in 2011 to 7.7% (95% CI, 5.9%-10.0%) in 2013. Among dual users, current e-cigarette use was negatively associated with intention to quit cigarette smoking for good (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.29-0.87) and with attempts to quit cigarette smoking in the past 12 months (RRR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.49-0.97). Current ecigarette smokers were less likely than those who only smoked cigarettes to have ever abstained from cigarette smoking for 6 months (RRR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82) or 1 year (RRR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.09-0.51) and to have used any kind of aids for smoking cessation (RRR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.74). Conclusion Public health practitioners and cessation clinic service providers should educate adolescents about the risks of using any nicotinecontaining products, including e-cigarettes, and provide adequate tobacco cessation resources and counseling to adolescent tobacco users.

AB - Introduction Although adolescent cigarette use continues to decline in the United States, electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use among adolescents has escalated rapidly. This study assessed trends and patterns of e-cigarette use and concurrent cigarette smoking and the relationships between e-cigarette use and smoking cessation intentions and behaviors among high school students in North Carolina. Methods Data came from high school students who completed the schoolbased, cross-sectional North Carolina Youth Tobacco Survey in 2011 (n = 4,791) and 2013 (n = 4,092). This study assessed changes in prevalence of e-cigarette and cigarette use from 2011 through 2013, and cessation-related factors associated with those students' current and past use of e-cigarettes in 2013. Results The prevalence of current e-cigarette use (use in the past 30 days) significantly increased from 1.7% (95% CI, 1.3%-2.2%) in 2011 to 7.7% (95% CI, 5.9%-10.0%) in 2013. Among dual users, current e-cigarette use was negatively associated with intention to quit cigarette smoking for good (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.29-0.87) and with attempts to quit cigarette smoking in the past 12 months (RRR = 0.69; 95% CI, 0.49-0.97). Current ecigarette smokers were less likely than those who only smoked cigarettes to have ever abstained from cigarette smoking for 6 months (RRR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.21-0.82) or 1 year (RRR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.09-0.51) and to have used any kind of aids for smoking cessation (RRR = 0.46; 95% CI, 0.29-0.74). Conclusion Public health practitioners and cessation clinic service providers should educate adolescents about the risks of using any nicotinecontaining products, including e-cigarettes, and provide adequate tobacco cessation resources and counseling to adolescent tobacco users.

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