Elderly use of the ED in an asian metropolis

Sheng Chuan Hu, David Yen, Ya Cheng Yu, Wei Fong Kao, Li Min Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To compare emergency department (ED) use by elderly patients (age 65 yrs or older) with that by younger adult patients (age 15-64 yrs), a prospective consecutive chart review study was conducted from August 1, 1995 through May 31, 1996 in eight designated hospitals in Taipei city (which has 2.6 million residents, 8.4% of whom are 65 yrs or older). Patient age, sex, mode of arrival, living status, triage category, advanced life support (ALS) eligibility, referral, confinement to bed, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, impression, trauma mechanism, and disposition were recorded and compared between the two groups. Of 27,765 adult emergency patients studied during the 10 months, 24% were elderly. The elderly were more likely to be ambulance cases, of high acuity and ALS eligibility, living alone, bed- ridden, and ICU cases (19.4% v 10.5%, 14.8% v 5.5%, 14.7% v 4.3%, 9.7% v 4.1%, 16% v 1.1%, and 4.0 v 1.1%, respectively). The three leading illnesses in the elderly were cerebral vascular accident (6.6%), cancer (5.6%), and cardiovascular disease (5.6%), and the two most common trauma mechanisms were trip (fall from the same level surface) (57.2%) and traffic accident (20.7%). Twenty-seven percent and 22.7% of elderly were disposed to admission and observation, respectively, compared with the 10.9% and 11.4% of the younger patients. Elderly patients have significantly different and more severe presentations to the ED compared with younger adults.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)95-99
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Emergency Medicine
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hospital Emergency Service
Intensive Care Units
Young Adult
Ambulances
Traffic Accidents
Triage
Wounds and Injuries
Accidents
Blood Vessels
Emergencies
Cardiovascular Diseases
Referral and Consultation
Observation
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Emergency department
  • Epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Elderly use of the ED in an asian metropolis. / Hu, Sheng Chuan; Yen, David; Yu, Ya Cheng; Kao, Wei Fong; Wang, Li Min.

In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 1, 1999, p. 95-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hu, Sheng Chuan ; Yen, David ; Yu, Ya Cheng ; Kao, Wei Fong ; Wang, Li Min. / Elderly use of the ED in an asian metropolis. In: American Journal of Emergency Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 95-99.
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abstract = "To compare emergency department (ED) use by elderly patients (age 65 yrs or older) with that by younger adult patients (age 15-64 yrs), a prospective consecutive chart review study was conducted from August 1, 1995 through May 31, 1996 in eight designated hospitals in Taipei city (which has 2.6 million residents, 8.4{\%} of whom are 65 yrs or older). Patient age, sex, mode of arrival, living status, triage category, advanced life support (ALS) eligibility, referral, confinement to bed, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, impression, trauma mechanism, and disposition were recorded and compared between the two groups. Of 27,765 adult emergency patients studied during the 10 months, 24{\%} were elderly. The elderly were more likely to be ambulance cases, of high acuity and ALS eligibility, living alone, bed- ridden, and ICU cases (19.4{\%} v 10.5{\%}, 14.8{\%} v 5.5{\%}, 14.7{\%} v 4.3{\%}, 9.7{\%} v 4.1{\%}, 16{\%} v 1.1{\%}, and 4.0 v 1.1{\%}, respectively). The three leading illnesses in the elderly were cerebral vascular accident (6.6{\%}), cancer (5.6{\%}), and cardiovascular disease (5.6{\%}), and the two most common trauma mechanisms were trip (fall from the same level surface) (57.2{\%}) and traffic accident (20.7{\%}). Twenty-seven percent and 22.7{\%} of elderly were disposed to admission and observation, respectively, compared with the 10.9{\%} and 11.4{\%} of the younger patients. Elderly patients have significantly different and more severe presentations to the ED compared with younger adults.",
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