Effects of walking on quality of life among lung cancer patients: A longitudinal study

Yi Yun Lin, Megan F. Liu, Jann Inn Tzeng, Chia Chin Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Walking is typically the preferred form of physical activity among lung cancer patients. Physical activity can promote and maintain the health of such patients. Objective: We examined how walking affected the quality of life (QOL) of lung cancer patients, evaluating the factors that predicted changes in walking during a 6-months study. Methods: This study involved a longitudinal and correlational design, and the instruments comprised the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer, and social support and self-efficacy scales. Results: In total, 107 patients were evaluated for 6 months; the results indicated that the patients completed approximately 217 to 282 minutes of walking per week. The data demonstrated that the frequency of walking exercise decreased or stopped among 36% patients during the 6-month study. A generalized estimating equation analysis indicated significant differences between the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer scores and levels of physical and functional well-being among the lung cancer patients who did and did not engage in walking. Social support, self-efficacy, and patient treatment status can be used to predict the change in walking among lung cancer patients. Conclusion: Patient QOL can be improved by engaging in walking exercise for 6 months. Regarding lung cancer patients, social support and self-efficacy are the key factors in maintaining walking exercise. Implications for Practice: Integrating psychological strategies may be required to strengthen the positive effects of walking exercise on the QOL of lung cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)253-259
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Nursing
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2 2015

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Walking
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms
Quality of Life
Exercise
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Leisure Activities
Therapeutics
Psychology
Health

Keywords

  • Longitudinal study
  • Lung cancer
  • Quality of life (QOL)
  • Walking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Effects of walking on quality of life among lung cancer patients : A longitudinal study. / Lin, Yi Yun; Liu, Megan F.; Tzeng, Jann Inn; Lin, Chia Chin.

In: Cancer Nursing, Vol. 38, No. 4, 02.07.2015, p. 253-259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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