Effects of respiratory time ratio on heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity

Yong Ping Wang, Terry B.J. Kuo, Chun Ting Lai, Jui Wen Chu, Cheryl C.H. Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Paced breathing is a frequently performed technique for cardiovascular autonomic studies. The relative timing of inspiration and expiration during paced breathing, however, is not consistent. We, therefore, examined whether indexes of heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity would be affected by the respiratory time ratio that is set. We studied 14 healthy young adults who controlled their breathing rates to either 0.1 or 0.25 Hz in the supine and sitting positions. Four different inspiratory-to-expiratory time ratios (I/E) (uncontrolled, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3) were examined for each condition in a randomized order. The results showed spectral indexes of heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity were not influenced by the I/E that was set during paced breathing under supine and sitting positions. Porta's and Guzik's indexes of heart rate asymmetry were also not different at various I/E during 0.1-Hz breathing, but had larger values at 1:1 during 0.25-Hz breathing, although significant change was found in the sitting position only. At the same time, Porta's and Guzik's indexes obtained during 0.1-Hz breathing were greater than during 0.25-Hz breathing in both positions. The authors suggest that setting the I/E during paced breathing is not necessary when measuring spectral indexes of heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity under the conditions used in this study. The necessity of paced breathing for the measurement of heart rate asymmetry, however, requires further investigation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1648-1655
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume115
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Baroreflex
Respiration
Heart Rate
Posture
Supine Position
Young Adult

Keywords

  • Baroreflex
  • Heart rate variability
  • Respiration
  • Respiratory time ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Effects of respiratory time ratio on heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. / Wang, Yong Ping; Kuo, Terry B.J.; Lai, Chun Ting; Chu, Jui Wen; Yang, Cheryl C.H.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 115, No. 11, 01.12.2013, p. 1648-1655.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Yong Ping ; Kuo, Terry B.J. ; Lai, Chun Ting ; Chu, Jui Wen ; Yang, Cheryl C.H. / Effects of respiratory time ratio on heart rate variability and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2013 ; Vol. 115, No. 11. pp. 1648-1655.
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