Abstract

Loss of skeletal muscle mass is common with aging and can cause morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The effects of particulate air pollution on skeletal muscle mass is not known. The study aims to assess the chronic effects of ambient fine particulates (PM2.5) on the body composition of the elderly. From October 2015 to November 2016, a cross-sectional survey on 530 elderly (age > = 65 years) was conducted in the Taipei Basin, Taiwan. The body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (InBody 120). One year exposure to air pollution was estimated using the Kriging method at the participant's residence. Multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustments for demographics and co-pollutants, was used to examine the effects of PM2.5 on body composition indices and force of handgrip. Changes in body composition for an interquartile (1.4 μm/m3) increase in PM2.5 concentration included a 0.4 kg (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.31, -0.58; p < 0.0001) decrease in skeletal muscle mass (2.0%) and a 0.7 kg (95% CI: 0.47, 0.91; p < 0.0001) increase in body fat mass (3.6%). While PM2.5 reduced fat free mass in the upper extremities and trunk, but not in the lower extremities, it increased body fat mass in the three parts. There was no significant effect of PM2.5 on handgrip force. Higher physical activity (versus lower than median) was associated with less detrimental effect of PM2.5 on skeletal muscle mass and body fat mass (p values for interaction term: 0.009 and 0.013, respectively). Long-term PM2.5 exposure is associated with decreased skeletal muscle mass and increased body fat mass in the elderly, which can be ameliorated by physical activity.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
JournalScientific Reports
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2019

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Taiwan
Adipose Tissue
Body Composition
Skeletal Muscle
Air Pollution
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
Spatial Analysis
Electric Impedance
Upper Extremity
Lower Extremity
Linear Models
Cross-Sectional Studies
Fats
Regression Analysis
Demography
Morbidity
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Effects of PM2.5 on Skeletal Muscle Mass and Body Fat Mass of the Elderly in Taipei, Taiwan. / Chen, Chi Hsien; Huang, Li Ying; Lee, Kang Yun; Wu, Chih Da; Chiang, Hung Che; Chen, Bing Yu; Chin, Wei Shan; Pan, Shih Chun; Guo, Yue Leon.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 9, No. 1, 01.08.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Chi Hsien ; Huang, Li Ying ; Lee, Kang Yun ; Wu, Chih Da ; Chiang, Hung Che ; Chen, Bing Yu ; Chin, Wei Shan ; Pan, Shih Chun ; Guo, Yue Leon. / Effects of PM2.5 on Skeletal Muscle Mass and Body Fat Mass of the Elderly in Taipei, Taiwan. In: Scientific Reports. 2019 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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abstract = "Loss of skeletal muscle mass is common with aging and can cause morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The effects of particulate air pollution on skeletal muscle mass is not known. The study aims to assess the chronic effects of ambient fine particulates (PM2.5) on the body composition of the elderly. From October 2015 to November 2016, a cross-sectional survey on 530 elderly (age > = 65 years) was conducted in the Taipei Basin, Taiwan. The body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (InBody 120). One year exposure to air pollution was estimated using the Kriging method at the participant's residence. Multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustments for demographics and co-pollutants, was used to examine the effects of PM2.5 on body composition indices and force of handgrip. Changes in body composition for an interquartile (1.4 μm/m3) increase in PM2.5 concentration included a 0.4 kg (95{\%} confidence interval (CI): -0.31, -0.58; p < 0.0001) decrease in skeletal muscle mass (2.0{\%}) and a 0.7 kg (95{\%} CI: 0.47, 0.91; p < 0.0001) increase in body fat mass (3.6{\%}). While PM2.5 reduced fat free mass in the upper extremities and trunk, but not in the lower extremities, it increased body fat mass in the three parts. There was no significant effect of PM2.5 on handgrip force. Higher physical activity (versus lower than median) was associated with less detrimental effect of PM2.5 on skeletal muscle mass and body fat mass (p values for interaction term: 0.009 and 0.013, respectively). Long-term PM2.5 exposure is associated with decreased skeletal muscle mass and increased body fat mass in the elderly, which can be ameliorated by physical activity.",
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AU - Chin, Wei Shan

AU - Pan, Shih Chun

AU - Guo, Yue Leon

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