Effects of music on gastric myoelectrical activity in healthy humans

H. H. Lin, W. K. Chang, H. C. Chu, T. Y. Huang, Y. C. Chao, T. Y. Hsieh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim was to study the effects of listening to music on gastric myoelectrical activity in healthy humans. Gastric myoelectrical activity was recorded using surface electrogastrography from 17 healthy volunteers before and for 30 min after they listened to music. All subjects listened to the same music. Ten perceived the music as enjoyable and seven did not. The percentages of normal slow wave, dominant frequency and dominant power did not differ significantly between baseline and during music intervention. An analysis of covariance model that included the subjects' feelings about the music and dominant power showed significantly higher dominant power during music intervention in subjects who enjoyed the music (p < 0.01). In the individuals who enjoyed the music, dominant power (55.0 ± 9.2 dB) was significantly higher during music intervention than at baseline (49.5 ± 6.8 dB, p = 0.03). In the subjects who did not enjoy the music, dominant power was significantly lower during music intervention than at baseline (48.8 ± 6.8 and 55.7 ± 6.2 dB, respectively; p < 0.01). Listening to enjoyable music increases the amplitude of gastric myoelectrical activity in healthy humans. Music therapy may improve gastric motility and may be used to stimulate gastric emptying.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1126-1130
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Clinical Practice
Volume61
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Music
Stomach
Music Therapy
Gastric Emptying
Healthy Volunteers
Emotions
Power (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of music on gastric myoelectrical activity in healthy humans. / Lin, H. H.; Chang, W. K.; Chu, H. C.; Huang, T. Y.; Chao, Y. C.; Hsieh, T. Y.

In: International Journal of Clinical Practice, Vol. 61, No. 7, 01.07.2007, p. 1126-1130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lin, H. H. ; Chang, W. K. ; Chu, H. C. ; Huang, T. Y. ; Chao, Y. C. ; Hsieh, T. Y. / Effects of music on gastric myoelectrical activity in healthy humans. In: International Journal of Clinical Practice. 2007 ; Vol. 61, No. 7. pp. 1126-1130.
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