Effects of methylprednisolone on femoral bone marrow

Age-dependent susceptibility

Wing P. Chan, Tzong Fu Kuo, Yun Ho Lin, Chia Chun Chen, Shu Ru Yang, Sydney Huang, Ching Chuan Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: We aimed to test our primary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow in chickens are age-sensitive and increase with prolonged treatment and our secondary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow can have individual effects. Methods: Sixteen control (group A) and 29 methylprednisolone-treated (group B) chickens were categorised by age: pubertal chicks (subgroups A1, B1), young hens (A2, B2), and adult hens (A3, B3). Histologic evaluation 12 to 50 weeks after the start of methylprednisolone treatment included fat cell proliferation, trabecular bone loss, necrosis of bone and marrow, and new bone formation in the femoral head, neck, and intertrochanteric area. Results: There were significant differences between groups A1 and B1 in new bone formation in the femoral neck (P = 0.048) and fat cell proliferation in the femoral head (P = 0.008) and neck (P = 0.048). New bone formation in the femoral head was also significantly different (P = 0.023) between groups A2 and B2. No differences were noted between groups A3 and B3 (all P>0.05). Necrosis of bone and marrow was observed in four control and three methylprednisolone-treated chickens (P>0.05). Significant new bone formation and fat cell proliferation in pubertal and young chickens occurred 12 to 19 weeks after administration of high-dose methylprednisolone. Conclusions: Younger animals may be more susceptible to methylprednisolone, and responses to methylprednisolone in femoral marrow may vary among individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)500-506
Number of pages7
JournalHIP International
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Methylprednisolone
Thigh
Bone Marrow
Osteogenesis
Chickens
Adipocytes
Femur Neck
Cell Proliferation
Osteonecrosis
varespladib methyl
Necrosis
Neck
Control Groups

Keywords

  • Adipogenesis
  • Animals
  • Bone marrow
  • Osteonecrosis
  • Steroids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of methylprednisolone on femoral bone marrow : Age-dependent susceptibility. / Chan, Wing P.; Kuo, Tzong Fu; Lin, Yun Ho; Chen, Chia Chun; Yang, Shu Ru; Huang, Sydney; Jiang, Ching Chuan.

In: HIP International, Vol. 23, No. 5, 2013, p. 500-506.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chan, Wing P. ; Kuo, Tzong Fu ; Lin, Yun Ho ; Chen, Chia Chun ; Yang, Shu Ru ; Huang, Sydney ; Jiang, Ching Chuan. / Effects of methylprednisolone on femoral bone marrow : Age-dependent susceptibility. In: HIP International. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 500-506.
@article{e199f52dc7e743b2bded366a00139469,
title = "Effects of methylprednisolone on femoral bone marrow: Age-dependent susceptibility",
abstract = "Purpose: We aimed to test our primary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow in chickens are age-sensitive and increase with prolonged treatment and our secondary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow can have individual effects. Methods: Sixteen control (group A) and 29 methylprednisolone-treated (group B) chickens were categorised by age: pubertal chicks (subgroups A1, B1), young hens (A2, B2), and adult hens (A3, B3). Histologic evaluation 12 to 50 weeks after the start of methylprednisolone treatment included fat cell proliferation, trabecular bone loss, necrosis of bone and marrow, and new bone formation in the femoral head, neck, and intertrochanteric area. Results: There were significant differences between groups A1 and B1 in new bone formation in the femoral neck (P = 0.048) and fat cell proliferation in the femoral head (P = 0.008) and neck (P = 0.048). New bone formation in the femoral head was also significantly different (P = 0.023) between groups A2 and B2. No differences were noted between groups A3 and B3 (all P>0.05). Necrosis of bone and marrow was observed in four control and three methylprednisolone-treated chickens (P>0.05). Significant new bone formation and fat cell proliferation in pubertal and young chickens occurred 12 to 19 weeks after administration of high-dose methylprednisolone. Conclusions: Younger animals may be more susceptible to methylprednisolone, and responses to methylprednisolone in femoral marrow may vary among individuals.",
keywords = "Adipogenesis, Animals, Bone marrow, Osteonecrosis, Steroids",
author = "Chan, {Wing P.} and Kuo, {Tzong Fu} and Lin, {Yun Ho} and Chen, {Chia Chun} and Yang, {Shu Ru} and Sydney Huang and Jiang, {Ching Chuan}",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.5301/hipint.5000055",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "500--506",
journal = "HIP International",
issn = "1120-7000",
publisher = "Wichtig Publishing",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of methylprednisolone on femoral bone marrow

T2 - Age-dependent susceptibility

AU - Chan, Wing P.

AU - Kuo, Tzong Fu

AU - Lin, Yun Ho

AU - Chen, Chia Chun

AU - Yang, Shu Ru

AU - Huang, Sydney

AU - Jiang, Ching Chuan

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Purpose: We aimed to test our primary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow in chickens are age-sensitive and increase with prolonged treatment and our secondary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow can have individual effects. Methods: Sixteen control (group A) and 29 methylprednisolone-treated (group B) chickens were categorised by age: pubertal chicks (subgroups A1, B1), young hens (A2, B2), and adult hens (A3, B3). Histologic evaluation 12 to 50 weeks after the start of methylprednisolone treatment included fat cell proliferation, trabecular bone loss, necrosis of bone and marrow, and new bone formation in the femoral head, neck, and intertrochanteric area. Results: There were significant differences between groups A1 and B1 in new bone formation in the femoral neck (P = 0.048) and fat cell proliferation in the femoral head (P = 0.008) and neck (P = 0.048). New bone formation in the femoral head was also significantly different (P = 0.023) between groups A2 and B2. No differences were noted between groups A3 and B3 (all P>0.05). Necrosis of bone and marrow was observed in four control and three methylprednisolone-treated chickens (P>0.05). Significant new bone formation and fat cell proliferation in pubertal and young chickens occurred 12 to 19 weeks after administration of high-dose methylprednisolone. Conclusions: Younger animals may be more susceptible to methylprednisolone, and responses to methylprednisolone in femoral marrow may vary among individuals.

AB - Purpose: We aimed to test our primary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow in chickens are age-sensitive and increase with prolonged treatment and our secondary hypothesis that the effects of methylprednisolone on bone marrow can have individual effects. Methods: Sixteen control (group A) and 29 methylprednisolone-treated (group B) chickens were categorised by age: pubertal chicks (subgroups A1, B1), young hens (A2, B2), and adult hens (A3, B3). Histologic evaluation 12 to 50 weeks after the start of methylprednisolone treatment included fat cell proliferation, trabecular bone loss, necrosis of bone and marrow, and new bone formation in the femoral head, neck, and intertrochanteric area. Results: There were significant differences between groups A1 and B1 in new bone formation in the femoral neck (P = 0.048) and fat cell proliferation in the femoral head (P = 0.008) and neck (P = 0.048). New bone formation in the femoral head was also significantly different (P = 0.023) between groups A2 and B2. No differences were noted between groups A3 and B3 (all P>0.05). Necrosis of bone and marrow was observed in four control and three methylprednisolone-treated chickens (P>0.05). Significant new bone formation and fat cell proliferation in pubertal and young chickens occurred 12 to 19 weeks after administration of high-dose methylprednisolone. Conclusions: Younger animals may be more susceptible to methylprednisolone, and responses to methylprednisolone in femoral marrow may vary among individuals.

KW - Adipogenesis

KW - Animals

KW - Bone marrow

KW - Osteonecrosis

KW - Steroids

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84886775491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84886775491&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5301/hipint.5000055

DO - 10.5301/hipint.5000055

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 500

EP - 506

JO - HIP International

JF - HIP International

SN - 1120-7000

IS - 5

ER -