Effects of hematoma reduction by stereotactic aspiration for patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage

Tzu Tsao Chung, Cheng Ta Hsieh, Yuan Hao Chen, Cheng Fu Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background/Purpose: Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating medical condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Whether the hematoma should be surgically removed remains controversial. This study was a retrospective analysis of patients with spontaneous ICH who were treated with computed tomography (CT)-guided stereotactic aspiration. The aim of this study was to investigate whether hematoma volume reduction in deep-seated ICH utilizing this minimally invasive surgical procedure improves clinical outcome. Methods: Ninety-nine patients who suffered spontaneous ICH provided informed consent and were included in the study. Patients were divided into an operated group that underwent CT-guided stereotactic aspiration, and a nonoperated group that received only medical treatment. CT-guided stereotactic aspiration was performed at least 8 hours after onset of ICH. Using the Leksell stereotactic frame for guidance, a 4-mm-diameter catheter was inserted into the body of the hematoma through a frontal burr hole. Glasgow Coma Scale, motor function, and length of hospital stay were used to assess differences in outcomes between the 2 groups. The correlation between clinical outcome and stereotactic aspiration was evaluated using multivariate regression analysis. Results: Ninety-nine consecutive patients were entered into this study. Patients in the operated group (n=41) were treated with CT-guided stereotactic hematoma aspiration. The 3-month Glasgow Outcome Scale score in the nonoperated group (n=58) was significantly lower than that in the operated group (2.32±1.26 vs. 3.15±1.33, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-23
Number of pages7
JournalNeurosurgery Quarterly
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 27 2015

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Cerebral Hemorrhage
Hematoma
Tomography
Length of Stay
Glasgow Outcome Scale
Glasgow Coma Scale
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Informed Consent
Multivariate Analysis
Catheters
Regression Analysis
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Clot aspiration
  • intracerebral hemorrhage
  • stereotactic
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Effects of hematoma reduction by stereotactic aspiration for patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. / Chung, Tzu Tsao; Hsieh, Cheng Ta; Chen, Yuan Hao; Chang, Cheng Fu.

In: Neurosurgery Quarterly, Vol. 25, No. 1, 27.02.2015, p. 17-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chung, Tzu Tsao ; Hsieh, Cheng Ta ; Chen, Yuan Hao ; Chang, Cheng Fu. / Effects of hematoma reduction by stereotactic aspiration for patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. In: Neurosurgery Quarterly. 2015 ; Vol. 25, No. 1. pp. 17-23.
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