Effects of ambient particulate matter and fungal spores on lung function in schoolchildren

Bing Yu Chen, Hsing-Jasmine Chao, G. Chuan Chan, Chung Te Lee, Hung Pin Wu, Tsun Jen Cheng, Chu Chih Chen, Yue Leon Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Studies examining the combined health effects of both have been relatively lacking. We conducted a longitudinal study to investigate whether exposure to air pollutants and fungal spores might exacerbate childhood respiratory health. METHODS: Study participants were 100 elementary and middle-school students in Taipei County, Taiwan. A structured respiratory health questionnaire was administered in September 2007, followed by monthly spirometry from October 2007 to June 2008. During the study period, complete daily monitoring data for criteria air pollutants were obtained from the Environmental Protection Administration monitoring station and Aerosol Supersite. Fungal spores were measured from Sunday to Saturday in the week when lung-function measurements were made for each study month. Lung-function measurements were compared with air pollutants and fungal spores using mixed-effects models with 1-day-lag modeling. RESULTS: The particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less level 1 day before the lung function measurements was negatively associated with forced vital capacity. The fungal spore level was negatively associated with both forced expiratory vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second. O3 level was negatively associated with forced expiratory flow at 25%, 50%, and 75% of forced vital capacity, and average expiratory flow over the middle half of forced vital capacity. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggested that exposure to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less and fungal spores might cause adverse effects on the vital capacity of schoolchildren. Exposure to O3 adversely affected small airway function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e690-e698
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume127
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Fungal Spores
Particulate Matter
Vital Capacity
Air Pollutants
Lung
Health
Spirometry
Conservation of Natural Resources
Forced Expiratory Volume
Aerosols
Taiwan
Longitudinal Studies
Students

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Children
  • Forced vital capacity
  • Fungal spores
  • Lung function
  • Particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm or less
  • Particulates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Chen, B. Y., Chao, H-J., Chan, G. C., Lee, C. T., Wu, H. P., Cheng, T. J., ... Guo, Y. L. (2011). Effects of ambient particulate matter and fungal spores on lung function in schoolchildren. Pediatrics, 127(3), e690-e698. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-1038

Effects of ambient particulate matter and fungal spores on lung function in schoolchildren. / Chen, Bing Yu; Chao, Hsing-Jasmine; Chan, G. Chuan; Lee, Chung Te; Wu, Hung Pin; Cheng, Tsun Jen; Chen, Chu Chih; Guo, Yue Leon.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 127, No. 3, 03.2011, p. e690-e698.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, BY, Chao, H-J, Chan, GC, Lee, CT, Wu, HP, Cheng, TJ, Chen, CC & Guo, YL 2011, 'Effects of ambient particulate matter and fungal spores on lung function in schoolchildren', Pediatrics, vol. 127, no. 3, pp. e690-e698. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-1038
Chen, Bing Yu ; Chao, Hsing-Jasmine ; Chan, G. Chuan ; Lee, Chung Te ; Wu, Hung Pin ; Cheng, Tsun Jen ; Chen, Chu Chih ; Guo, Yue Leon. / Effects of ambient particulate matter and fungal spores on lung function in schoolchildren. In: Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 127, No. 3. pp. e690-e698.
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