Effects of β-carotene, vitamin C and E on antioxidant status in hyperlipidemic smokers

Jane Chao, Chiung Hui Huang, S. J. Wu, Suh-Ching Yang, Nen-Chung Chang, Ming-Che Hsieh, Ping Nan Lo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Smoking can accelerate the consumption of the stored antioxidant vitamins and increase the oxidative stress in the hyperlipidemic patients. The study investigated the effects of combined β-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E on plasma antioxidant levels, erythrocyte antioxidative enzyme activities, and LDL lipid peroxides. Male hyperlipidemic smokers (35-78 years old) were randomly divided into two antioxidant supplemented groups: intervention 1 (I1, n = 22) (15 mg β-carotene/day, 500 mg vitamin C/day, and 400 mg α-tocopherol equivalent/day) and intervention 2 (I2, n = 20) (30 mg β-carotene/day, 1000 mg vitamin C/day, and 800 mg α-tocopherol equivalent/day). After 6-week supplementation, plasma β-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and erythrocyte glutathione levels increased significantly by 200%, 98%, 129%, and 39%, respectively, in the I1 group, and by 209%, 216%, 197%, and 32%, respectively, in the I2 group. Plasma Fe+2 concentrations and Fe+2/Fe+3 decreased significantly in both groups. Except erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase activity in the I1 group, erythrocyte catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activities increased significantly in both groups. Lipid peroxides in LDL decreased significantly by 56% and 72% in the I1 and I2 groups, respectively. However, the levels of plasma iron, erythrocyte glutathione, and LDL lipid peroxides, and the activities of erythrocyte antioxidative enzymes did not differ between two groups. In conclusion, combined antioxidant supplements increased plasma antioxidant levels and antioxidative enzyme activities, and lowered LDL lipid peroxides in male hyperlipidemic smokers. Higher dosage of the supplements did not have an additive effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-434
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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Carotenoids
Vitamin E
Ascorbic Acid
Lipid Peroxides
Antioxidants
Erythrocytes
Plasmas
Tocopherols
Enzyme activity
Glutathione Peroxidase
Glutathione
Enzymes
Oxidative stress
Vitamins
Catalase
Superoxide Dismutase
Iron
Oxidative Stress
Smoking
oxidized low density lipoprotein

Keywords

  • β-Carotene
  • Antioxidative enzyme
  • Hyperlipidemic smokers
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Effects of β-carotene, vitamin C and E on antioxidant status in hyperlipidemic smokers. / Chao, Jane; Huang, Chiung Hui; Wu, S. J.; Yang, Suh-Ching; Chang, Nen-Chung; Hsieh, Ming-Che; Lo, Ping Nan.

In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, Vol. 13, No. 7, 2002, p. 427-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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