Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of electrical stimulation in arm function recovery after stroke. Methods: Data were obtained from the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and Scopus databases from their inception until 12 January 2019. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting the effects of electrical stimulation on the recovery of arm function after stroke were selected. Results: Forty-eight RCTs with a total of 1712 patients were included in the analysis. The body function assessment, Upper-Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment, indicated more favorable outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than in the placebo group immediately after treatment (23 RCTs (n = 794): standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.51–0.84) and at follow-up (12 RCTs (n = 391): SMD = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.35–0.97). The activity assessment, Action Research Arm Test, revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group immediately after treatment (10 RCTs (n = 411): SMD = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.39–1.02) and at follow-up (8 RCTs (n = 289): SMD = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.34–1.52). Other activity assessments, including Wolf Motor Function Test, Box and Block Test, and Motor Activity Log, also revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group. Comparisons between three types of electrical stimulation (sensory, cyclic, and electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation) groups revealed no significant differences in the body function and activity. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation therapy can effectively improve the arm function in stroke patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2019

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Electric Stimulation Therapy
Electric Stimulation
Meta-Analysis
Arm
Randomized Controlled Trials
Stroke
Confidence Intervals
Recovery of Function
Placebos
Health Services Research
Electromyography
PubMed
Upper Extremity
Libraries
Motor Activity
Databases
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Electric stimulation therapy
  • meta-analysis
  • stroke
  • upper extremity (arm)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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title = "Effectiveness of electrical stimulation therapy in improving arm function after stroke: a systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of electrical stimulation in arm function recovery after stroke. Methods: Data were obtained from the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and Scopus databases from their inception until 12 January 2019. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting the effects of electrical stimulation on the recovery of arm function after stroke were selected. Results: Forty-eight RCTs with a total of 1712 patients were included in the analysis. The body function assessment, Upper-Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment, indicated more favorable outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than in the placebo group immediately after treatment (23 RCTs (n = 794): standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.67, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) = 0.51–0.84) and at follow-up (12 RCTs (n = 391): SMD = 0.66, 95{\%} CI = 0.35–0.97). The activity assessment, Action Research Arm Test, revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group immediately after treatment (10 RCTs (n = 411): SMD = 0.70, 95{\%} CI = 0.39–1.02) and at follow-up (8 RCTs (n = 289): SMD = 0.93, 95{\%} CI = 0.34–1.52). Other activity assessments, including Wolf Motor Function Test, Box and Block Test, and Motor Activity Log, also revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group. Comparisons between three types of electrical stimulation (sensory, cyclic, and electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation) groups revealed no significant differences in the body function and activity. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation therapy can effectively improve the arm function in stroke patients.",
keywords = "Electric stimulation therapy, meta-analysis, stroke, upper extremity (arm)",
author = "Yang, {Jheng Dao} and Liao, {Chun De} and Huang, {Shih Wei} and Tam, {Ka Wai} and Liou, {Tsan Hon} and Lee, {Yu Hao} and Lin, {Chia Yun} and Chen, {Hung Chou}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0269215519839165",
language = "English",
journal = "Clinical Rehabilitation",
issn = "0269-2155",
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T1 - Effectiveness of electrical stimulation therapy in improving arm function after stroke

T2 - a systematic review and a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

AU - Yang, Jheng Dao

AU - Liao, Chun De

AU - Huang, Shih Wei

AU - Tam, Ka Wai

AU - Liou, Tsan Hon

AU - Lee, Yu Hao

AU - Lin, Chia Yun

AU - Chen, Hung Chou

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of electrical stimulation in arm function recovery after stroke. Methods: Data were obtained from the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and Scopus databases from their inception until 12 January 2019. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting the effects of electrical stimulation on the recovery of arm function after stroke were selected. Results: Forty-eight RCTs with a total of 1712 patients were included in the analysis. The body function assessment, Upper-Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment, indicated more favorable outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than in the placebo group immediately after treatment (23 RCTs (n = 794): standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.51–0.84) and at follow-up (12 RCTs (n = 391): SMD = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.35–0.97). The activity assessment, Action Research Arm Test, revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group immediately after treatment (10 RCTs (n = 411): SMD = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.39–1.02) and at follow-up (8 RCTs (n = 289): SMD = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.34–1.52). Other activity assessments, including Wolf Motor Function Test, Box and Block Test, and Motor Activity Log, also revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group. Comparisons between three types of electrical stimulation (sensory, cyclic, and electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation) groups revealed no significant differences in the body function and activity. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation therapy can effectively improve the arm function in stroke patients.

AB - Objective: The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of electrical stimulation in arm function recovery after stroke. Methods: Data were obtained from the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, and Scopus databases from their inception until 12 January 2019. Only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting the effects of electrical stimulation on the recovery of arm function after stroke were selected. Results: Forty-eight RCTs with a total of 1712 patients were included in the analysis. The body function assessment, Upper-Extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment, indicated more favorable outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than in the placebo group immediately after treatment (23 RCTs (n = 794): standard mean difference (SMD) = 0.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.51–0.84) and at follow-up (12 RCTs (n = 391): SMD = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.35–0.97). The activity assessment, Action Research Arm Test, revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group immediately after treatment (10 RCTs (n = 411): SMD = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.39–1.02) and at follow-up (8 RCTs (n = 289): SMD = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.34–1.52). Other activity assessments, including Wolf Motor Function Test, Box and Block Test, and Motor Activity Log, also revealed superior outcomes in the electrical stimulation group than those in the placebo group. Comparisons between three types of electrical stimulation (sensory, cyclic, and electromyography-triggered electrical stimulation) groups revealed no significant differences in the body function and activity. Conclusion: Electrical stimulation therapy can effectively improve the arm function in stroke patients.

KW - Electric stimulation therapy

KW - meta-analysis

KW - stroke

KW - upper extremity (arm)

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