Effect of the mother's consumption of traditional Chinese herbs on estimated infant daily intake of lead from breast milk

Ling Chu Chien, Ching-Ying Yeh, Hung Chang Lee, Hsing Jasmine Chao, Ming-Che Hsieh, Bor Cheng Han

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infant exposure to lead through breast milk is of special concern because breast milk is considered the best food source for infants under 6 months. In this study, a total of the mothers provided colostrum samples once in the early postpartum period, but only 16 of them provided breast milk weekly at 1-60 days postpartum. The geometric mean of lead concentrations in all colostrum samples (n=72) was 7.68±8.24 μg/L. The concentration of lead in the breast milk of the consumption group (the mothers who consumed traditional Chinese herbs) was 8.59±10.95 μg/L, a level significantly higher than the level of 6.84±2.68 μg/L found in the control group (mothers who did not consume traditional Chinese herbs). In the consumption group (n=9), the mean concentration of lead in the breast milk decreased with days postpartum, from 9.94 μg/L in colostrum to 2.34 μg/L in mature milk. We found the highest daily lead intake in infants at birth, and the level gradually decreased after the first month. We used an estimation of the hazard index (HI) to analyze the health risk of infants. In total, 5.7% (2 out of 35) of the HI estimates exceed 1.0 for the consumption group. In conclusion, the consumptions of traditional Chinese herbs by the mothers in this study significantly affected the body burden of lead in their infants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)120-126
Number of pages7
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume354
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2006

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Keywords

  • Breast milk
  • Daily lead intake
  • Hazard index
  • Traditional Chinese herbs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Effect of the mother's consumption of traditional Chinese herbs on estimated infant daily intake of lead from breast milk. / Chien, Ling Chu; Yeh, Ching-Ying; Lee, Hung Chang; Jasmine Chao, Hsing; Hsieh, Ming-Che; Han, Bor Cheng.

In: Science of the Total Environment, Vol. 354, No. 2-3, 01.02.2006, p. 120-126.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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