Effect of tannic acid-fish scale gelatin hydrolysate hybrid nanoparticles on intestinal barrier function and α-amylase activity

Shao Jung Wu, Yi Cheng Ho, Shun Zhou Jiang, Fwu Long Mi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Practical application of tannic acid is limited because it readily binds proteins to form insoluble aggregates. In this study, tannic acid was self-assembled with fish scale gelatin hydrolysates (FSGH) to form stable colloidal complex nanoparticles. The nanoparticles prepared from 4 mg ml-1 tannic acid and 4 mg ml-1 FSGH had a mean particle size of 260.8 ± 3.6 nm, and showed a positive zeta potential (20.4 ± 0.4 mV). The nanoparticles acted as effective nano-biochelators and free radical scavengers because they provided a large number of adsorption sites for interaction with heavy metal ions and scavenging free radicals. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cu2+ ions was 123.5 mg g-1 and EC50 of DPPH radical scavenging activity was 21.6 ± 1.2 μg ml-1. Hydroxyl radical scavenging effects of the nanoparticles were investigated by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. The copper-chelating capacity and free radical scavenging activity of the nanoparticles were associated with their capacity to inhibit Cu2+ ion-induced barrier impairment and hyperpermeability of Caco-2 intestinal epithelial tight junction (TJ). However, α-amylase inhibitory activity of the nanoparticles was significantly lower than that of free tannic acid. The results suggest that the nanoparticles can ameliorate Cu2+ ion induced intestinal epithelial TJ dysfunction without severely inhibiting the activity of the digestive enzymes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2283-2292
Number of pages10
JournalFood and Function
Volume6
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2015

Fingerprint

Tannins
nanoparticles
Gelatin
Amylases
gelatin
hydrolysates
amylases
Nanoparticles
tannins
Fishes
fish
tight junctions
Tight Junctions
Ions
ions
Adsorption
Free Radicals
adsorption
Heavy Ions
Free Radical Scavengers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Effect of tannic acid-fish scale gelatin hydrolysate hybrid nanoparticles on intestinal barrier function and α-amylase activity. / Wu, Shao Jung; Ho, Yi Cheng; Jiang, Shun Zhou; Mi, Fwu Long.

In: Food and Function, Vol. 6, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 2283-2292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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