Effect of nanostructured thin film on minimally invasive surgery devices applications: characterization, cell cytotoxicity evaluation and an animal study in rat

Keng Liang Ou, Chao Chia Weng, Erwan Sugiatno, Muhammad Ruslin, Yun Ho Lin, Han Yi Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Minimally invasive surgery is performed using an endoscope and other instruments including the electrosurgical units. However, concerns including surgical smoke, tissue sticking and thermal injury are remaining in electrosurgery. Aims: Accordingly, a newly developed electrosurgical electrode coating with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) film is purposed to improve the instrument performance. Methods: The morphologies of DLC-Cu surfaces were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In this study, lesions were made on the liver lobes of adult rats, using a monopolar electrosurgical unit equipped with untreated stainless steel electrodes or treated-electrodes. Animals were killed for evaluations at 0, 3, 7 and 28 days postoperatively. Results: Treated-electrodes generate less sticking tissues and adhesive blood cells. Thermography revealed that the surgical temperature in liver tissue from the treated-electrode was significantly lower than the untreated-electrode. Total injury area of livers treated with treated-electrodes was significantly smaller than the untreated-electrodes treatment. Moreover, treated-electrodes caused a relatively smaller area of lateral thermal injury, a smaller area of fibrotic tissue and a faster process of remodeling than the untreated-electrodes. Western blot analysis showed that rats treated with treated-electrode expressed lower levels of NF-κB, caspase-3 and MMP-9 than untreated-electrode. Immunofluorescence staining for caspase-3 revealed that the untreated-electrode caused more serious injury. Conclusions: This study reveals that the plating of electrodes with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon film is an efficient method for improving the performance of electrosurgical units, and should benefit wound remodeling. However, more tests must be carried out to confirm these promising findings in human patients.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSurgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Electrodes
Equipment and Supplies
Wounds and Injuries
Diamond
Caspase 3
Liver
Carbon
Hot Temperature
Electrosurgery
Tissue Adhesives
Atomic Force Microscopy
Endoscopes
Stainless Steel
Matrix Metalloproteinases
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Smoke
Electron Scanning Microscopy
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Blood Cells

Keywords

  • Biomedical coating
  • In vivo test
  • Minimally invasive surgery
  • Monopolar electrosurgery
  • Thermal injury
  • Tissue sticking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

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title = "Effect of nanostructured thin film on minimally invasive surgery devices applications: characterization, cell cytotoxicity evaluation and an animal study in rat",
abstract = "Background: Minimally invasive surgery is performed using an endoscope and other instruments including the electrosurgical units. However, concerns including surgical smoke, tissue sticking and thermal injury are remaining in electrosurgery. Aims: Accordingly, a newly developed electrosurgical electrode coating with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) film is purposed to improve the instrument performance. Methods: The morphologies of DLC-Cu surfaces were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In this study, lesions were made on the liver lobes of adult rats, using a monopolar electrosurgical unit equipped with untreated stainless steel electrodes or treated-electrodes. Animals were killed for evaluations at 0, 3, 7 and 28 days postoperatively. Results: Treated-electrodes generate less sticking tissues and adhesive blood cells. Thermography revealed that the surgical temperature in liver tissue from the treated-electrode was significantly lower than the untreated-electrode. Total injury area of livers treated with treated-electrodes was significantly smaller than the untreated-electrodes treatment. Moreover, treated-electrodes caused a relatively smaller area of lateral thermal injury, a smaller area of fibrotic tissue and a faster process of remodeling than the untreated-electrodes. Western blot analysis showed that rats treated with treated-electrode expressed lower levels of NF-κB, caspase-3 and MMP-9 than untreated-electrode. Immunofluorescence staining for caspase-3 revealed that the untreated-electrode caused more serious injury. Conclusions: This study reveals that the plating of electrodes with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon film is an efficient method for improving the performance of electrosurgical units, and should benefit wound remodeling. However, more tests must be carried out to confirm these promising findings in human patients.",
keywords = "Biomedical coating, In vivo test, Minimally invasive surgery, Monopolar electrosurgery, Thermal injury, Tissue sticking",
author = "Ou, {Keng Liang} and Weng, {Chao Chia} and Erwan Sugiatno and Muhammad Ruslin and Lin, {Yun Ho} and Cheng, {Han Yi}",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1007/s00464-015-4596-9",
language = "English",
journal = "Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques",
issn = "0930-2794",
publisher = "Springer New York LLC",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of nanostructured thin film on minimally invasive surgery devices applications

T2 - characterization, cell cytotoxicity evaluation and an animal study in rat

AU - Ou, Keng Liang

AU - Weng, Chao Chia

AU - Sugiatno, Erwan

AU - Ruslin, Muhammad

AU - Lin, Yun Ho

AU - Cheng, Han Yi

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Background: Minimally invasive surgery is performed using an endoscope and other instruments including the electrosurgical units. However, concerns including surgical smoke, tissue sticking and thermal injury are remaining in electrosurgery. Aims: Accordingly, a newly developed electrosurgical electrode coating with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) film is purposed to improve the instrument performance. Methods: The morphologies of DLC-Cu surfaces were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In this study, lesions were made on the liver lobes of adult rats, using a monopolar electrosurgical unit equipped with untreated stainless steel electrodes or treated-electrodes. Animals were killed for evaluations at 0, 3, 7 and 28 days postoperatively. Results: Treated-electrodes generate less sticking tissues and adhesive blood cells. Thermography revealed that the surgical temperature in liver tissue from the treated-electrode was significantly lower than the untreated-electrode. Total injury area of livers treated with treated-electrodes was significantly smaller than the untreated-electrodes treatment. Moreover, treated-electrodes caused a relatively smaller area of lateral thermal injury, a smaller area of fibrotic tissue and a faster process of remodeling than the untreated-electrodes. Western blot analysis showed that rats treated with treated-electrode expressed lower levels of NF-κB, caspase-3 and MMP-9 than untreated-electrode. Immunofluorescence staining for caspase-3 revealed that the untreated-electrode caused more serious injury. Conclusions: This study reveals that the plating of electrodes with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon film is an efficient method for improving the performance of electrosurgical units, and should benefit wound remodeling. However, more tests must be carried out to confirm these promising findings in human patients.

AB - Background: Minimally invasive surgery is performed using an endoscope and other instruments including the electrosurgical units. However, concerns including surgical smoke, tissue sticking and thermal injury are remaining in electrosurgery. Aims: Accordingly, a newly developed electrosurgical electrode coating with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) film is purposed to improve the instrument performance. Methods: The morphologies of DLC-Cu surfaces were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In this study, lesions were made on the liver lobes of adult rats, using a monopolar electrosurgical unit equipped with untreated stainless steel electrodes or treated-electrodes. Animals were killed for evaluations at 0, 3, 7 and 28 days postoperatively. Results: Treated-electrodes generate less sticking tissues and adhesive blood cells. Thermography revealed that the surgical temperature in liver tissue from the treated-electrode was significantly lower than the untreated-electrode. Total injury area of livers treated with treated-electrodes was significantly smaller than the untreated-electrodes treatment. Moreover, treated-electrodes caused a relatively smaller area of lateral thermal injury, a smaller area of fibrotic tissue and a faster process of remodeling than the untreated-electrodes. Western blot analysis showed that rats treated with treated-electrode expressed lower levels of NF-κB, caspase-3 and MMP-9 than untreated-electrode. Immunofluorescence staining for caspase-3 revealed that the untreated-electrode caused more serious injury. Conclusions: This study reveals that the plating of electrodes with hydrogenated Cu-incorporated diamond-like carbon film is an efficient method for improving the performance of electrosurgical units, and should benefit wound remodeling. However, more tests must be carried out to confirm these promising findings in human patients.

KW - Biomedical coating

KW - In vivo test

KW - Minimally invasive surgery

KW - Monopolar electrosurgery

KW - Thermal injury

KW - Tissue sticking

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U2 - 10.1007/s00464-015-4596-9

DO - 10.1007/s00464-015-4596-9

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AN - SCOPUS:84946866038

JO - Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques

JF - Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques

SN - 0930-2794

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