Effect of influenza vaccination against postoperative pneumonia and mortality for geriatric patients receiving major surgery: A nationwide matched study

Wan Chi Liu, Chao Shun Lin, Chun Chieh Yeh, Hsin Yun Wu, Yuarn Jang Lee, Chi Li Chung, Yih Giun Cherng, Ta Liang Chen, Chien Chang Liao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

a propensity score matching procedure adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, medical condition, surgery type, and anesthesia type, 16 903 controls who underwent surgery but were not vaccinated were selected. Logistic regressions were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for postoperative pneumonia and in-hospital mortality associated with influenza vaccination. Results. Patients who received preoperative influenza vaccination had a lower risk of postoperative pneumonia (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, .56-.64) and in-hospital mortality (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, .39-.56), compared with unvaccinated patients, in both sexes and every age group. Vaccinated patients who underwent surgery also had a decreased risk of postoperative intensive care unit admission (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, .53-.60), shorter hospital stays (P < .0001), and lower medical expenditures (P < .0001) than nonvaccinated controls. Conclusions. Vaccinated geriatric patients who underwent surgery had lower risks of pneumonia and in-hospital mortality, compared with unvaccinated patients who underwent similar major surgeries. Further studies are needed to explain how preoperative influenza vaccination improves perioperative outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)816-826
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume217
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2018

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Geriatrics
Human Influenza
Pneumonia
Vaccination
Hospital Mortality
Odds Ratio
Mortality
Confidence Intervals
Propensity Score
Postoperative Care
Health Expenditures
Intensive Care Units
Length of Stay
Anesthesia
Age Groups
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Influenza vaccination
  • Mortality
  • Pneumonia
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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title = "Effect of influenza vaccination against postoperative pneumonia and mortality for geriatric patients receiving major surgery: A nationwide matched study",
abstract = "a propensity score matching procedure adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, medical condition, surgery type, and anesthesia type, 16 903 controls who underwent surgery but were not vaccinated were selected. Logistic regressions were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) for postoperative pneumonia and in-hospital mortality associated with influenza vaccination. Results. Patients who received preoperative influenza vaccination had a lower risk of postoperative pneumonia (OR, 0.60; 95{\%} CI, .56-.64) and in-hospital mortality (OR, 0.46; 95{\%} CI, .39-.56), compared with unvaccinated patients, in both sexes and every age group. Vaccinated patients who underwent surgery also had a decreased risk of postoperative intensive care unit admission (OR, 0.56; 95{\%} CI, .53-.60), shorter hospital stays (P < .0001), and lower medical expenditures (P < .0001) than nonvaccinated controls. Conclusions. Vaccinated geriatric patients who underwent surgery had lower risks of pneumonia and in-hospital mortality, compared with unvaccinated patients who underwent similar major surgeries. Further studies are needed to explain how preoperative influenza vaccination improves perioperative outcomes.",
keywords = "Influenza vaccination, Mortality, Pneumonia, Surgery",
author = "Liu, {Wan Chi} and Lin, {Chao Shun} and Yeh, {Chun Chieh} and Wu, {Hsin Yun} and Lee, {Yuarn Jang} and Chung, {Chi Li} and Cherng, {Yih Giun} and Chen, {Ta Liang} and Liao, {Chien Chang}",
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AU - Liu, Wan Chi

AU - Lin, Chao Shun

AU - Yeh, Chun Chieh

AU - Wu, Hsin Yun

AU - Lee, Yuarn Jang

AU - Chung, Chi Li

AU - Cherng, Yih Giun

AU - Chen, Ta Liang

AU - Liao, Chien Chang

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N2 - a propensity score matching procedure adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, medical condition, surgery type, and anesthesia type, 16 903 controls who underwent surgery but were not vaccinated were selected. Logistic regressions were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for postoperative pneumonia and in-hospital mortality associated with influenza vaccination. Results. Patients who received preoperative influenza vaccination had a lower risk of postoperative pneumonia (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, .56-.64) and in-hospital mortality (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, .39-.56), compared with unvaccinated patients, in both sexes and every age group. Vaccinated patients who underwent surgery also had a decreased risk of postoperative intensive care unit admission (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, .53-.60), shorter hospital stays (P < .0001), and lower medical expenditures (P < .0001) than nonvaccinated controls. Conclusions. Vaccinated geriatric patients who underwent surgery had lower risks of pneumonia and in-hospital mortality, compared with unvaccinated patients who underwent similar major surgeries. Further studies are needed to explain how preoperative influenza vaccination improves perioperative outcomes.

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KW - Mortality

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