Effect of Anti-Sticking Nanostructured Surface Coating on Minimally Invasive Electrosurgical Device in Brain

Han Yi Cheng, Keng Liang Ou, Hsi Jen Chiang, Li Hsiang Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to examine the extent of thermal injury in the brain after the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device with a nanostructured copper-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) surface coating. To effectively utilize an electrosurgical device in clinical surgery, it is important to decrease the thermal injury to the adjacent tissues. The surface characteristics and morphology of DLC-Cu thin film was evaluated using a contact angle goniometer, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Three-dimensional biomedical brain models were reconstructed using magnetic resonance images to simulate the electrosurgical procedure. Results indicated that the temperature was reduced significantly when a minimally invasive electrosurgical device with a DLC-Cu thin film coating (DLC-Cu-SS) was used. Temperatures decreased with the use of devices with increasing film thickness. Thermographic data revealed that surgical temperatures in an animal model were significantly lower with the DLC-Cu-SS electrosurgical device compared to an untreated device. Furthermore, the DLC-Cu-SS device created a relatively small region of injury and lateral thermal range. As described above, the biomedical nanostructured film reduced excessive thermal injury with the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device in the brain.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2383-2393
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume43
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 8 2015

Fingerprint

Brain
Coatings
Brain models
Goniometers
Thin films
Magnetic resonance
Temperature
Surgery
Contact angle
Film thickness
Atomic force microscopy
Diamonds
Animals
Tissue
Copper
Scanning electron microscopy
Carbon
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Electrosurgical device
  • Nanostructured film
  • Thermal injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Effect of Anti-Sticking Nanostructured Surface Coating on Minimally Invasive Electrosurgical Device in Brain. / Cheng, Han Yi; Ou, Keng Liang; Chiang, Hsi Jen; Lin, Li Hsiang.

In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 43, No. 10, 08.04.2015, p. 2383-2393.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, Han Yi ; Ou, Keng Liang ; Chiang, Hsi Jen ; Lin, Li Hsiang. / Effect of Anti-Sticking Nanostructured Surface Coating on Minimally Invasive Electrosurgical Device in Brain. In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering. 2015 ; Vol. 43, No. 10. pp. 2383-2393.
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