Early postoperative seizures after posterior fossa surgery

S. T. Lee, T. N. Lui, C. N. Chang, W. C. Cheng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A review is reported of the seizure incidence in 726 patients who underwent 740 posterior fossa operations via a suboccipital craniectomy without prophylactic anticonvulsant agents. Thirteen patients (1.8%) experienced seizures within 2 weeks postoperatively. Five of these patients (0.7% of the series) had seizures within 24 hours after operation. The incidence was highest for patients with medulloblastoma (7.2%) followed by those with astrocytoma (2.3%). Also, a higher percentage was found in patients with preoperative ventriculoperitoneal shunt or intraoperative ventriculostomy (2.7%) than in those without (1%), but the difference was not statistically significant. Metabolic acidosis (80%) and hyponatremia (20%) were the major causes of the seizures that developed within 24 hours after operation. Follow-up computerized tomography showed no definite lesion in these patients. Hydrocephalus (75%) and supratentorial hemorrhage remote from the operative site (25%) were detected in the patients who developed seizures between the 2nd and 14th postoperative day. Two of these patients also had postoperative bacterial meningitis. This review suggests that seizures are a possible complication in the early postoperative period after suboccipital craniectomy for posterior fossa lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)541-544
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume73
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Seizures
Ventriculostomy
Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt
Medulloblastoma
Bacterial Meningitides
Hyponatremia
Incidence
Astrocytoma
Hydrocephalus
Acidosis
Postoperative Period
Anticonvulsants
Tomography
Hemorrhage

Keywords

  • posterior fossa
  • postoperative complication seizures
  • suboccipital craniectomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Lee, S. T., Lui, T. N., Chang, C. N., & Cheng, W. C. (1990). Early postoperative seizures after posterior fossa surgery. Journal of Neurosurgery, 73(4), 541-544.

Early postoperative seizures after posterior fossa surgery. / Lee, S. T.; Lui, T. N.; Chang, C. N.; Cheng, W. C.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 73, No. 4, 1990, p. 541-544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, ST, Lui, TN, Chang, CN & Cheng, WC 1990, 'Early postoperative seizures after posterior fossa surgery', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 73, no. 4, pp. 541-544.
Lee ST, Lui TN, Chang CN, Cheng WC. Early postoperative seizures after posterior fossa surgery. Journal of Neurosurgery. 1990;73(4):541-544.
Lee, S. T. ; Lui, T. N. ; Chang, C. N. ; Cheng, W. C. / Early postoperative seizures after posterior fossa surgery. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 1990 ; Vol. 73, No. 4. pp. 541-544.
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