Early gastric cancer as a possible cause of cauda equina syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation

S. C. Wei, J. M. Wong, C. L. Chen, A. L. Cheng, C. Y. Wang, T. H. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Early gastric cancer is an important gastric malignancy which is defined as adenocarcinoma confined to the mucosa or submucosa of the stomach with or without simultaneous metastases involving regional lymph nodes. The prognosis of early gastric cancer is generally good with a 5-year survival rate of about 95%. Distant metastases and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) usually occur in the advanced stage of gastric cancer but are relatively rare in early gastric cancer. Cauda equina syndrome has never before been reported as the initial presentation of gastric cancer, and to our knowledge, up to 1993. only 17 cases of early gastric cancer with synchronous liver metastases had been reported. Bone metastases with DIC and adrenal metastasis are both rare in early gastric cancer. Herein, we present a case of early gastric cancer with an initial presentation including cauda equina syndrome and DIC. Synchronous hepatic, adrenal gland, pulmonary, bone and bone marrow metastases were found two days after admission. The patient had a fulminant clinical course and died 45 days after the diagnosis. A small focus (0.8 x 0.5 cm) of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma located in the mucosa and submucosa at the gastric lower body with extensive lymphatic permeation around the primary focus and duodenum were noted at autopsy. Cancers with an unknown primary accounted for 4.9% of cancers presenting with disseminated intravascular coagulation. Our experience disclosed that early gastric cancer is a potential cause of cauda equina syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)51-55
Number of pages5
JournalDigestive Endoscopy
Volume9
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Polyradiculopathy
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
Stomach Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Stomach
Mucous Membrane
Adenocarcinoma
Bone and Bones
Neoplasms
Liver
Adrenal Glands
Duodenum
Autopsy
Survival Rate
Lymph Nodes
Bone Marrow

Keywords

  • Cauda equina syndrome
  • Disseminated intravascular coagulation
  • Early gastric cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Early gastric cancer as a possible cause of cauda equina syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation. / Wei, S. C.; Wong, J. M.; Chen, C. L.; Cheng, A. L.; Wang, C. Y.; Wang, T. H.

In: Digestive Endoscopy, Vol. 9, No. 1, 1997, p. 51-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wei, S. C. ; Wong, J. M. ; Chen, C. L. ; Cheng, A. L. ; Wang, C. Y. ; Wang, T. H. / Early gastric cancer as a possible cause of cauda equina syndrome and disseminated intravascular coagulation. In: Digestive Endoscopy. 1997 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 51-55.
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