Ear blast injury - A case report

Shih Han Hung, Su Yi Hsu, Pa Chun Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The auditory apparatus is the most vulnerable organ system to a blast injury, but blast damage to the auditory system is often overlooked in the emergency room when management of other life-threatening major vital organ trauma is prioritized. We report on a Caucasian patient who survived the Bali Island bombing in October 2002. The patient presented with dizziness, otorrhea, conductive hearing loss, and bilateral tympanic membrane perforation. CSF leakage and incus-stapes joint dislocation were found in the left ear during the operation. Spontaneous healing of the right tympanic membrane perforation was noted 3 months after the blast injury. His conductive hearing loss returned to normal, and the CSF leakage ceased after proper middle ear reconstruction. Ear blast injury is rarely reported in peacetime literature; we discuss the mechanism, pathophysiology, management, and outcomes of this unusual situation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-210
Number of pages6
JournalTzu Chi Medical Journal
Volume16
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Blast Injuries
Tympanic Membrane Perforation
Conductive Hearing Loss
Ear
Incus
Stapes
Dizziness
Middle Ear
Joint Dislocations
Islands
Hospital Emergency Service
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Conductive hearing loss
  • CSF leakage
  • Ear blast injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hung, S. H., Hsu, S. Y., & Wang, P. C. (2004). Ear blast injury - A case report. Tzu Chi Medical Journal, 16(3), 205-210.

Ear blast injury - A case report. / Hung, Shih Han; Hsu, Su Yi; Wang, Pa Chun.

In: Tzu Chi Medical Journal, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2004, p. 205-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hung, SH, Hsu, SY & Wang, PC 2004, 'Ear blast injury - A case report', Tzu Chi Medical Journal, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 205-210.
Hung SH, Hsu SY, Wang PC. Ear blast injury - A case report. Tzu Chi Medical Journal. 2004 Jun;16(3):205-210.
Hung, Shih Han ; Hsu, Su Yi ; Wang, Pa Chun. / Ear blast injury - A case report. In: Tzu Chi Medical Journal. 2004 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 205-210.
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