Drug Screening Identifies Niclosamide as an Inhibitor of Breast Cancer Stem-Like Cells

Yu Chi Wang, Tai Kuang Chao, Cheng Chang Chang, Yi Te Yo, Mu Hsien Yu, Hung Cheng Lai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The primary cause of death from breast cancer is the progressive growth of tumors and resistance to conventional therapies. It is currently believed that recurrent cancer is repopulated according to a recently proposed cancer stem cell hypothesis. New therapeutic strategies that specifically target cancer stem-like cells may represent a new avenue of cancer therapy. We aimed to discover novel compounds that target breast cancer stem-like cells. We used a dye-exclusion method to isolate side population (SP) cancer cells and, subsequently, subjected these SP cells to a sphere formation assay to generate SP spheres (SPS) from breast cancer cell lines. Surface markers, stemness genes, and tumorigenicity were used to test stem properties. We performed a high-throughput drug screening using these SPS. The effects of candidate compounds were assessed in vitro and in vivo. We successfully generated breast cancer SPS with stem-like properties. These SPS were enriched for CD44high (2.8-fold) and CD24low (4-fold) cells. OCT4 and ABCG2 were overexpressed in SPS. Moreover, SPS grew tumors at a density of 103, whereas an equivalent number of parental cells did not initiate tumor formation. A clinically approved drug, niclosamide, was identified from the LOPAC chemical library of 1,258 compounds. Niclosamide downregulated stem pathways, inhibited the formation of spheroids, and induced apoptosis in breast cancer SPS. Animal studies also confirmed this therapeutic effect. The results of this proof-of-principle study may facilitate the development of new breast cancer therapies in the near future. The extension of niclosamide clinical trials is warranted.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere74538
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 18 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Niclosamide
niclosamide
Preclinical Drug Evaluations
Neoplastic Stem Cells
breast neoplasms
Screening
Breast Neoplasms
screening
drugs
neoplasms
stems
therapeutics
Side-Population Cells
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Neoplasms
cells
Tumors
Small Molecule Libraries
Cells
Therapeutic Uses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Drug Screening Identifies Niclosamide as an Inhibitor of Breast Cancer Stem-Like Cells. / Wang, Yu Chi; Chao, Tai Kuang; Chang, Cheng Chang; Yo, Yi Te; Yu, Mu Hsien; Lai, Hung Cheng.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 9, e74538, 18.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, Yu Chi ; Chao, Tai Kuang ; Chang, Cheng Chang ; Yo, Yi Te ; Yu, Mu Hsien ; Lai, Hung Cheng. / Drug Screening Identifies Niclosamide as an Inhibitor of Breast Cancer Stem-Like Cells. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 9.
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