Does the oral administration of ginger reduce chemotherapy-Induced nausea and vomiting? A Meta-analysis of 10 Randomized Controlled Trials

Wen P Chang, Yu X Peng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Preclinical tests in animals have shown that ginger extract can be used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV); however, research findings in clinical trials have not been conclusive.

OBJECTIVE: Through this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine whether ginger could be used to treat CINV, which was interpreted using the PICOS (patient, problem/population, intervention, comparison, outcome, study) framework, with P being patients who underwent chemotherapy; I being 0.5 to 2.0 g/d of Zingiberaceae, Zintoma, dry ginger, ginger capsules, powdered ginger root, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, ginger extract, powdered ginger, 6-gingerol, or shogalos; C being placebo or standard care; and O being the relief, reduction, or improvement of CINV.

METHOD: Via systematic literature review, we searched for studies in English from 2000 to 2017 in databases. We conducted a meta-analysis using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2 on a total of 10 studies with complete data.

RESULTS: The odds ratio (OR) of ginger in controlling CINV was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.94; P = .015). Heterogeneity existed among the samples; therefore, we proceeded with a subgroup analysis and divided nausea and vomiting into acute or delayed. The results revealed that ginger could only reduce acute CINV in patients (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.42-0.86; P = .006), particularly acute vomiting (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.94; P = .025).

CONCLUSIONS: Ginger displayed significant efficacy with regard to controlling CINV in the experimental groups.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Our results could provide a reference for antiemetic methods to treat CINV and facilitate support for more clinical trials in the future to establish relevant guidelines.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCancer Nursing
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Oct 6 2018

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Ginger
Nausea
Vomiting
Oral Administration
Meta-Analysis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Drug Therapy
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Zingiberaceae
Clinical Trials
Antiemetics
Capsules
Placebos

Cite this

@article{49d2d2c7e8ee431aa02cdda8b8ba74f5,
title = "Does the oral administration of ginger reduce chemotherapy-Induced nausea and vomiting?: A Meta-analysis of 10 Randomized Controlled Trials",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Preclinical tests in animals have shown that ginger extract can be used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV); however, research findings in clinical trials have not been conclusive.OBJECTIVE: Through this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine whether ginger could be used to treat CINV, which was interpreted using the PICOS (patient, problem/population, intervention, comparison, outcome, study) framework, with P being patients who underwent chemotherapy; I being 0.5 to 2.0 g/d of Zingiberaceae, Zintoma, dry ginger, ginger capsules, powdered ginger root, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, ginger extract, powdered ginger, 6-gingerol, or shogalos; C being placebo or standard care; and O being the relief, reduction, or improvement of CINV.METHOD: Via systematic literature review, we searched for studies in English from 2000 to 2017 in databases. We conducted a meta-analysis using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2 on a total of 10 studies with complete data.RESULTS: The odds ratio (OR) of ginger in controlling CINV was 0.71 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.94; P = .015). Heterogeneity existed among the samples; therefore, we proceeded with a subgroup analysis and divided nausea and vomiting into acute or delayed. The results revealed that ginger could only reduce acute CINV in patients (OR, 0.60; 95{\%} CI, 0.42-0.86; P = .006), particularly acute vomiting (OR, 0.58; 95{\%} CI, 0.37-0.94; P = .025).CONCLUSIONS: Ginger displayed significant efficacy with regard to controlling CINV in the experimental groups.IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Our results could provide a reference for antiemetic methods to treat CINV and facilitate support for more clinical trials in the future to establish relevant guidelines.",
author = "Chang, {Wen P} and Peng, {Yu X}",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1097/NCC.0000000000000648",
language = "English",
journal = "Cancer Nursing",
issn = "0162-220X",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Does the oral administration of ginger reduce chemotherapy-Induced nausea and vomiting?

T2 - A Meta-analysis of 10 Randomized Controlled Trials

AU - Chang, Wen P

AU - Peng, Yu X

PY - 2018/10/6

Y1 - 2018/10/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: Preclinical tests in animals have shown that ginger extract can be used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV); however, research findings in clinical trials have not been conclusive.OBJECTIVE: Through this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine whether ginger could be used to treat CINV, which was interpreted using the PICOS (patient, problem/population, intervention, comparison, outcome, study) framework, with P being patients who underwent chemotherapy; I being 0.5 to 2.0 g/d of Zingiberaceae, Zintoma, dry ginger, ginger capsules, powdered ginger root, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, ginger extract, powdered ginger, 6-gingerol, or shogalos; C being placebo or standard care; and O being the relief, reduction, or improvement of CINV.METHOD: Via systematic literature review, we searched for studies in English from 2000 to 2017 in databases. We conducted a meta-analysis using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2 on a total of 10 studies with complete data.RESULTS: The odds ratio (OR) of ginger in controlling CINV was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.94; P = .015). Heterogeneity existed among the samples; therefore, we proceeded with a subgroup analysis and divided nausea and vomiting into acute or delayed. The results revealed that ginger could only reduce acute CINV in patients (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.42-0.86; P = .006), particularly acute vomiting (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.94; P = .025).CONCLUSIONS: Ginger displayed significant efficacy with regard to controlling CINV in the experimental groups.IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Our results could provide a reference for antiemetic methods to treat CINV and facilitate support for more clinical trials in the future to establish relevant guidelines.

AB - BACKGROUND: Preclinical tests in animals have shown that ginger extract can be used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV); however, research findings in clinical trials have not been conclusive.OBJECTIVE: Through this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine whether ginger could be used to treat CINV, which was interpreted using the PICOS (patient, problem/population, intervention, comparison, outcome, study) framework, with P being patients who underwent chemotherapy; I being 0.5 to 2.0 g/d of Zingiberaceae, Zintoma, dry ginger, ginger capsules, powdered ginger root, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, ginger extract, powdered ginger, 6-gingerol, or shogalos; C being placebo or standard care; and O being the relief, reduction, or improvement of CINV.METHOD: Via systematic literature review, we searched for studies in English from 2000 to 2017 in databases. We conducted a meta-analysis using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2 on a total of 10 studies with complete data.RESULTS: The odds ratio (OR) of ginger in controlling CINV was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.94; P = .015). Heterogeneity existed among the samples; therefore, we proceeded with a subgroup analysis and divided nausea and vomiting into acute or delayed. The results revealed that ginger could only reduce acute CINV in patients (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.42-0.86; P = .006), particularly acute vomiting (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.94; P = .025).CONCLUSIONS: Ginger displayed significant efficacy with regard to controlling CINV in the experimental groups.IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Our results could provide a reference for antiemetic methods to treat CINV and facilitate support for more clinical trials in the future to establish relevant guidelines.

U2 - 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000648

DO - 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000648

M3 - Article

C2 - 30299420

JO - Cancer Nursing

JF - Cancer Nursing

SN - 0162-220X

ER -