DNA adduct level in lung tissue may act as a risk biomarker of lung cancer

Y. W. Cheng, C. Y. Chen, P. Lin, C. P. Chen, K. H. Huang, T. S. Lin, M. H. Wu, H. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Lung cancer is a leading cause of mortality in Taiwan. We hypothesised that high susceptibility to DNA damage in the target organ acts as a risk biomarker for the development of lung cancer. To verify this hypothesis, the aromatic/hydrophobic DNA adduct levels of non-tumorous adjacent lung tissues from 73 primary lung cancer patients and 33 non-cancer controls were evaluated by 32P-postlabelling assay. Wilcoxon rank sum test showed that DNA adduct levels in lung cancer patients (49.58±33.39 adducts/108 nucleotides) were significantly higher than those in non-cancer controls (18.00±15.33 adducts/108 nucleotides, P48.66 adducts/108 nucleotides) had an approximately 25-fold risk of lung cancer compared with persons with low DNA adduct levels (≤48.66 adducts/108 nucleotides). In conclusion, DNA adduct levels in lung tissue may be a more reliable lung cancer susceptibility biomarker than DNA adduct levels in leucocytes. In addition, higher susceptibility to DNA damage in lung cancer patients may partly play a role in the development of lung cancer. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1381-1388
Number of pages8
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

DNA Adducts
Lung Neoplasms
Biomarkers
Lung
Nucleotides
Nonparametric Statistics
DNA Damage
Tumor Biomarkers
Taiwan
Leukocytes
Mortality

Keywords

  • Aromatic/hydrophobic DNA adducts
  • Lung cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Cheng, Y. W., Chen, C. Y., Lin, P., Chen, C. P., Huang, K. H., Lin, T. S., ... Lee, H. (2000). DNA adduct level in lung tissue may act as a risk biomarker of lung cancer. European Journal of Cancer, 36(11), 1381-1388. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0959-8049(00)00131-3

DNA adduct level in lung tissue may act as a risk biomarker of lung cancer. / Cheng, Y. W.; Chen, C. Y.; Lin, P.; Chen, C. P.; Huang, K. H.; Lin, T. S.; Wu, M. H.; Lee, H.

In: European Journal of Cancer, Vol. 36, No. 11, 07.2000, p. 1381-1388.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cheng, YW, Chen, CY, Lin, P, Chen, CP, Huang, KH, Lin, TS, Wu, MH & Lee, H 2000, 'DNA adduct level in lung tissue may act as a risk biomarker of lung cancer', European Journal of Cancer, vol. 36, no. 11, pp. 1381-1388. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0959-8049(00)00131-3
Cheng, Y. W. ; Chen, C. Y. ; Lin, P. ; Chen, C. P. ; Huang, K. H. ; Lin, T. S. ; Wu, M. H. ; Lee, H. / DNA adduct level in lung tissue may act as a risk biomarker of lung cancer. In: European Journal of Cancer. 2000 ; Vol. 36, No. 11. pp. 1381-1388.
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