Distribution, habitat, and conservation status of the near-threatened Japanese paradise-flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata periophthalmica) on lanyu, Taiwan

T. Späth, M.-L. Bai, L.L. Severinghaus, B.A. Walther

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The near-threatened Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata) consists of three subspecies, one of which, T. a. periophthalmica, has an important population on Lanyu, Taiwan. After briefly reviewing the species’ conservation status in its breeding range, we describe our field work in Lanyu during the breeding seasons of 2009 and 2010. We first established that the territory size of a male flycatcher is around 1.16 hectares. We then visited 224 1-hectare grid cells randomly distributed across Lanyu and established 120 presence grid cells. We then used these presence grid cells and nine environmental data layers to build an ensemble distribution model using the software Maxent. The model showed that the Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher prefers relatively wet forest habitats at elevations of 50–300 m. Using the model, we estimated that the extent of suitable habitat covered approximately 12.0 km2 (or 26%) of Lanyu’s surface area, which could hold approximately 1000 male territories. Forest cover increased between 1948 and 2006 by approximately 7.6 km2 (or 16%) of Lanyu’s surface area, which, all other things being equal, should have resulted in a population increase of around 30%. Given the absence of current threats, the Lanyu population is assumed to be relatively stable. Given this new information and our review of the species’ conservation status, we suggest that the species may be down-listed to “least concern.” However, if the distinct subspecies T. a. periophthalmica would be elevated to species status or be considered two independent conservation units (one in Lanyu and one in Batanes, Philippines), its conservation status would be much more precarious given it only occurs in five known localities (Lanyu and four islands in Batanes) of limited geographic range, and a population size of approximately 1000 males in Lanyu and an unknown population size in Batanes. Therefore, we conclude that more information is needed about (1) the species’ status in Batanes, (2) its migration and wintering grounds, and (3) the taxonomic status of the three subspecies. © 2018 by the author(s).
Original languageEnglish
JournalAvian Conservation and Ecology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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conservation status
subspecies
Taiwan
species conservation
population size
surface area
habitat
habitats
forest habitats
cells
forest cover
breeding season
Philippines
fieldwork
population growth
breeding
software
distribution

Keywords

  • Breeding population
  • Conservation status
  • Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher
  • Maxent
  • Terpsiphone atrocaudata

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Distribution, habitat, and conservation status of the near-threatened Japanese paradise-flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata periophthalmica) on lanyu, Taiwan. / Späth, T.; Bai, M.-L.; Severinghaus, L.L.; Walther, B.A.

In: Avian Conservation and Ecology, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Distribution, habitat, and conservation status of the near-threatened Japanese paradise-flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata periophthalmica) on lanyu, Taiwan",
abstract = "The near-threatened Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata) consists of three subspecies, one of which, T. a. periophthalmica, has an important population on Lanyu, Taiwan. After briefly reviewing the species’ conservation status in its breeding range, we describe our field work in Lanyu during the breeding seasons of 2009 and 2010. We first established that the territory size of a male flycatcher is around 1.16 hectares. We then visited 224 1-hectare grid cells randomly distributed across Lanyu and established 120 presence grid cells. We then used these presence grid cells and nine environmental data layers to build an ensemble distribution model using the software Maxent. The model showed that the Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher prefers relatively wet forest habitats at elevations of 50–300 m. Using the model, we estimated that the extent of suitable habitat covered approximately 12.0 km2 (or 26{\%}) of Lanyu’s surface area, which could hold approximately 1000 male territories. Forest cover increased between 1948 and 2006 by approximately 7.6 km2 (or 16{\%}) of Lanyu’s surface area, which, all other things being equal, should have resulted in a population increase of around 30{\%}. Given the absence of current threats, the Lanyu population is assumed to be relatively stable. Given this new information and our review of the species’ conservation status, we suggest that the species may be down-listed to “least concern.” However, if the distinct subspecies T. a. periophthalmica would be elevated to species status or be considered two independent conservation units (one in Lanyu and one in Batanes, Philippines), its conservation status would be much more precarious given it only occurs in five known localities (Lanyu and four islands in Batanes) of limited geographic range, and a population size of approximately 1000 males in Lanyu and an unknown population size in Batanes. Therefore, we conclude that more information is needed about (1) the species’ status in Batanes, (2) its migration and wintering grounds, and (3) the taxonomic status of the three subspecies. {\circledC} 2018 by the author(s).",
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author = "T. Sp{\"a}th and M.-L. Bai and L.L. Severinghaus and B.A. Walther",
note = "Export Date: 12 October 2018 通訊地址: Walther, B.A.; Global Health and Development, Taipei Medical University, College of Public Health, Taiwan; 電子郵件: bawalther2009@gmail.com 出資詳情: TS, TMU, Taipei Medical University 出資詳情: DAAD, Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst 出資正文: We are grateful to Gui-Qing Wang for providing valuable personal field observations from Lanyu, and Chin-Kuo Lee for interpreting aerial photographs of Lanyu. We thank Mark Brazil, Amy Chernasky, Chang-Yong Choi, Mike Crosby, Juan Carlos Tecson Gonzalez, Hiroyoshi Higuchi, Han-kyu Kim, Jin-Won Lee, Ruey-Shing Lin, and Carl Oliveros for providing references and additional information, Tsai-Yu Wu for help with modelling, Tsai-Yu Wu and Yu-Wen Emily Dai for translations, and several reviewers for comments. BAW was financially supported by Taipei Medical University. TS was financially supported by a grant from German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). Covering the costs for overall logistics, material, and additional support by field assistants was only possible because of substantial funding from Forestry Bureau of Council of Agriculture of Executive Yuan and Academia Sinica. 參考文獻: (2015) Species Factsheet: Terpsiphone Atrocaudata. [Online, , http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22707151; (2014) Status of birds 2014, , http://www.birdskorea.org/Habitats/Yellow-Sea/YSBR/Downloads/Birds-Korea-Status-of-Birds-2014.pdf, Birds Korea, Busan, Republic of Korea. [online]; Brazil, M., (2009) Birds of East Asia: China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia, , Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, USA; Brazil, M.A., (1991) The Birds of Japan, , Christopher Helm, London, UK; Brazil, M.A., The nature of Japan: From dancing cranes to flying fish (2013) Japan Nature Guides, Japan; Coates, B.J., Dutson, G.C.L., Filardi, C.E., Clement, P., Gregory, P.A., Moeliker, C.W., Family Monarchidae (Monarch-flycatchers) (2006) Handbook of the Birds of the World, 11, pp. 244-329. , in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D. Christie, editors, Old World flycatchers to Old World warblers. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona; Fang, W.-H., (2005) A Guide to Threatened Birds of Taiwan, , Taipei, Taiwan; Gonzalez, J.C.T., Afuang, L.E., Lacaste, A.V., Identifying conservation priorities for terrestrial vertebrate fauna in the Batanes Islands, northern Philippines (2008) Journal of Nature Studies, 7, pp. 1-8; Higuchi, H., Morishita, E., Population declines of tropical migratory birds in Japan (1999) Actinia, 12, pp. 51-59; Hirano, T., Changes in breeding avifauna during the past 25 years at Tomatsuriyama in Utsunomiya City, central Japan (1996) Strix, 14, pp. 25-31; Kim, C.-H., Kang, J.-H., Lee, Y., Kim, D.-W., Suh, J.-H., Kim, M., Distribution of the endangered birds species in South Korea (2010) Korean Journal of Ornithology, 17, pp. 67-137; Kim, Y.-H., Kim, W.-B., Oh, H.-S., The distribution of black paradise flycatcher on Jeju Island and management (2010) Korean Journal of Ornithology, 18, pp. 141-148; Kim, Y.-H., Oh, H.-S., Jang, Y.-C., Choi, S.-S., Nest environment selection of black paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata) (2010) Korean Journal of Ornithology, 17, pp. 11-19; Lin, R.-S., Lu, Y.-J., Yang, C.-H., Tseng, T.-J., Ko, C.-J., Chen, W.-J., (2016) The red list of birds of Taiwan, 2016, , https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312045198_The_Red_List_of_Birds_of_Taiwan_2016, Endemic Species Research Institute and Forestry Bureau, Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan, Nantou, Taiwan. [online]; (2011) Red Data Book of Endangered Birds in Korea, , Published in Korean (with English summaries). National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon, Republic of Korea; (2012) Endemic Species of Korea, , National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon, Republic of Korea; Severinghaus, L.L., Ding, T.-S., Fang, W.-H., Lin, W.-H., Tsai, M.-C., Yen, C.-W., (2010) The avifauna of Taiwan (In Chinese), , Forestry Bureau of Council of Agriculture of Executive Yuan, Taipei, Taiwan; Severinghaus, L.L., Ding, T.-S., Fang, W.-H., Lin, W.-H., Tsai, M.-C., Yen, C.-W., (2017) The avifauna of Taiwan (In English), , http://conservation.forest.gov.tw/0001888, Forestry Bureau, Council of Agriculture, Taipei, Taiwan. [online]; Sugimura, K., Yamada, F., Miyamoto, A., Population trend, habitat change and conservation of the unique wildlife species on Amami Island, Japan (2003) Global Environmental Research, 7, pp. 79-89; Uchida, H., Black paradise flycatchers declined drastically in Higashimatsuyama city (In Japanese) (1996) Yacho, 591, p. 13; (2013) Wildlife Conservation Act of Taiwan, , http://law.coa.gov.tw/GLRSnewsout/EngLawContent.aspx?Type=E&id=146; Yamamoto, Y., Seto, N., Decrease of summer visiting birds in Yamaguchi Prefecture analyzed from records of regular birding events (1997) Strix, 15, pp. 15-23",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.5751/ACE-01167-130107",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
journal = "Avian Conservation and Ecology",
issn = "1712-6568",
publisher = "The Resilience Alliance",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Distribution, habitat, and conservation status of the near-threatened Japanese paradise-flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata periophthalmica) on lanyu, Taiwan

AU - Späth, T.

AU - Bai, M.-L.

AU - Severinghaus, L.L.

AU - Walther, B.A.

N1 - Export Date: 12 October 2018 通訊地址: Walther, B.A.; Global Health and Development, Taipei Medical University, College of Public Health, Taiwan; 電子郵件: bawalther2009@gmail.com 出資詳情: TS, TMU, Taipei Medical University 出資詳情: DAAD, Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst 出資正文: We are grateful to Gui-Qing Wang for providing valuable personal field observations from Lanyu, and Chin-Kuo Lee for interpreting aerial photographs of Lanyu. We thank Mark Brazil, Amy Chernasky, Chang-Yong Choi, Mike Crosby, Juan Carlos Tecson Gonzalez, Hiroyoshi Higuchi, Han-kyu Kim, Jin-Won Lee, Ruey-Shing Lin, and Carl Oliveros for providing references and additional information, Tsai-Yu Wu for help with modelling, Tsai-Yu Wu and Yu-Wen Emily Dai for translations, and several reviewers for comments. BAW was financially supported by Taipei Medical University. TS was financially supported by a grant from German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). Covering the costs for overall logistics, material, and additional support by field assistants was only possible because of substantial funding from Forestry Bureau of Council of Agriculture of Executive Yuan and Academia Sinica. 參考文獻: (2015) Species Factsheet: Terpsiphone Atrocaudata. [Online, , http://www.birdlife.org/datazone/species/factsheet/22707151; (2014) Status of birds 2014, , http://www.birdskorea.org/Habitats/Yellow-Sea/YSBR/Downloads/Birds-Korea-Status-of-Birds-2014.pdf, Birds Korea, Busan, Republic of Korea. [online]; Brazil, M., (2009) Birds of East Asia: China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and Russia, , Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey, USA; Brazil, M.A., (1991) The Birds of Japan, , Christopher Helm, London, UK; Brazil, M.A., The nature of Japan: From dancing cranes to flying fish (2013) Japan Nature Guides, Japan; Coates, B.J., Dutson, G.C.L., Filardi, C.E., Clement, P., Gregory, P.A., Moeliker, C.W., Family Monarchidae (Monarch-flycatchers) (2006) Handbook of the Birds of the World, 11, pp. 244-329. , in J. del Hoyo, A. Elliott, and D. Christie, editors, Old World flycatchers to Old World warblers. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona; Fang, W.-H., (2005) A Guide to Threatened Birds of Taiwan, , Taipei, Taiwan; Gonzalez, J.C.T., Afuang, L.E., Lacaste, A.V., Identifying conservation priorities for terrestrial vertebrate fauna in the Batanes Islands, northern Philippines (2008) Journal of Nature Studies, 7, pp. 1-8; Higuchi, H., Morishita, E., Population declines of tropical migratory birds in Japan (1999) Actinia, 12, pp. 51-59; Hirano, T., Changes in breeding avifauna during the past 25 years at Tomatsuriyama in Utsunomiya City, central Japan (1996) Strix, 14, pp. 25-31; Kim, C.-H., Kang, J.-H., Lee, Y., Kim, D.-W., Suh, J.-H., Kim, M., Distribution of the endangered birds species in South Korea (2010) Korean Journal of Ornithology, 17, pp. 67-137; Kim, Y.-H., Kim, W.-B., Oh, H.-S., The distribution of black paradise flycatcher on Jeju Island and management (2010) Korean Journal of Ornithology, 18, pp. 141-148; Kim, Y.-H., Oh, H.-S., Jang, Y.-C., Choi, S.-S., Nest environment selection of black paradise flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata) (2010) Korean Journal of Ornithology, 17, pp. 11-19; Lin, R.-S., Lu, Y.-J., Yang, C.-H., Tseng, T.-J., Ko, C.-J., Chen, W.-J., (2016) The red list of birds of Taiwan, 2016, , https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312045198_The_Red_List_of_Birds_of_Taiwan_2016, Endemic Species Research Institute and Forestry Bureau, Council of Agriculture, Executive Yuan, Nantou, Taiwan. [online]; (2011) Red Data Book of Endangered Birds in Korea, , Published in Korean (with English summaries). National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon, Republic of Korea; (2012) Endemic Species of Korea, , National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon, Republic of Korea; Severinghaus, L.L., Ding, T.-S., Fang, W.-H., Lin, W.-H., Tsai, M.-C., Yen, C.-W., (2010) The avifauna of Taiwan (In Chinese), , Forestry Bureau of Council of Agriculture of Executive Yuan, Taipei, Taiwan; Severinghaus, L.L., Ding, T.-S., Fang, W.-H., Lin, W.-H., Tsai, M.-C., Yen, C.-W., (2017) The avifauna of Taiwan (In English), , http://conservation.forest.gov.tw/0001888, Forestry Bureau, Council of Agriculture, Taipei, Taiwan. [online]; Sugimura, K., Yamada, F., Miyamoto, A., Population trend, habitat change and conservation of the unique wildlife species on Amami Island, Japan (2003) Global Environmental Research, 7, pp. 79-89; Uchida, H., Black paradise flycatchers declined drastically in Higashimatsuyama city (In Japanese) (1996) Yacho, 591, p. 13; (2013) Wildlife Conservation Act of Taiwan, , http://law.coa.gov.tw/GLRSnewsout/EngLawContent.aspx?Type=E&id=146; Yamamoto, Y., Seto, N., Decrease of summer visiting birds in Yamaguchi Prefecture analyzed from records of regular birding events (1997) Strix, 15, pp. 15-23

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The near-threatened Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata) consists of three subspecies, one of which, T. a. periophthalmica, has an important population on Lanyu, Taiwan. After briefly reviewing the species’ conservation status in its breeding range, we describe our field work in Lanyu during the breeding seasons of 2009 and 2010. We first established that the territory size of a male flycatcher is around 1.16 hectares. We then visited 224 1-hectare grid cells randomly distributed across Lanyu and established 120 presence grid cells. We then used these presence grid cells and nine environmental data layers to build an ensemble distribution model using the software Maxent. The model showed that the Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher prefers relatively wet forest habitats at elevations of 50–300 m. Using the model, we estimated that the extent of suitable habitat covered approximately 12.0 km2 (or 26%) of Lanyu’s surface area, which could hold approximately 1000 male territories. Forest cover increased between 1948 and 2006 by approximately 7.6 km2 (or 16%) of Lanyu’s surface area, which, all other things being equal, should have resulted in a population increase of around 30%. Given the absence of current threats, the Lanyu population is assumed to be relatively stable. Given this new information and our review of the species’ conservation status, we suggest that the species may be down-listed to “least concern.” However, if the distinct subspecies T. a. periophthalmica would be elevated to species status or be considered two independent conservation units (one in Lanyu and one in Batanes, Philippines), its conservation status would be much more precarious given it only occurs in five known localities (Lanyu and four islands in Batanes) of limited geographic range, and a population size of approximately 1000 males in Lanyu and an unknown population size in Batanes. Therefore, we conclude that more information is needed about (1) the species’ status in Batanes, (2) its migration and wintering grounds, and (3) the taxonomic status of the three subspecies. © 2018 by the author(s).

AB - The near-threatened Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher (Terpsiphone atrocaudata) consists of three subspecies, one of which, T. a. periophthalmica, has an important population on Lanyu, Taiwan. After briefly reviewing the species’ conservation status in its breeding range, we describe our field work in Lanyu during the breeding seasons of 2009 and 2010. We first established that the territory size of a male flycatcher is around 1.16 hectares. We then visited 224 1-hectare grid cells randomly distributed across Lanyu and established 120 presence grid cells. We then used these presence grid cells and nine environmental data layers to build an ensemble distribution model using the software Maxent. The model showed that the Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher prefers relatively wet forest habitats at elevations of 50–300 m. Using the model, we estimated that the extent of suitable habitat covered approximately 12.0 km2 (or 26%) of Lanyu’s surface area, which could hold approximately 1000 male territories. Forest cover increased between 1948 and 2006 by approximately 7.6 km2 (or 16%) of Lanyu’s surface area, which, all other things being equal, should have resulted in a population increase of around 30%. Given the absence of current threats, the Lanyu population is assumed to be relatively stable. Given this new information and our review of the species’ conservation status, we suggest that the species may be down-listed to “least concern.” However, if the distinct subspecies T. a. periophthalmica would be elevated to species status or be considered two independent conservation units (one in Lanyu and one in Batanes, Philippines), its conservation status would be much more precarious given it only occurs in five known localities (Lanyu and four islands in Batanes) of limited geographic range, and a population size of approximately 1000 males in Lanyu and an unknown population size in Batanes. Therefore, we conclude that more information is needed about (1) the species’ status in Batanes, (2) its migration and wintering grounds, and (3) the taxonomic status of the three subspecies. © 2018 by the author(s).

KW - Breeding population

KW - Conservation status

KW - Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher

KW - Maxent

KW - Terpsiphone atrocaudata

KW - Breeding population

KW - Conservation status

KW - Japanese Paradise-Flycatcher

KW - Maxent

KW - Terpsiphone atrocaudata

U2 - 10.5751/ACE-01167-130107

DO - 10.5751/ACE-01167-130107

M3 - Article

VL - 13

JO - Avian Conservation and Ecology

JF - Avian Conservation and Ecology

SN - 1712-6568

IS - 1

ER -