Distinct bone marrow-derived and tissue-resident macrophage lineages proliferate at key stages during inflammation

Luke C. Davies, Marcela Rosas, Stephen J. Jenkins, Chia Te Liao, Martin J. Scurr, Frank Brombacher, Donald J. Fraser, Judith E. Allen, Simon A. Jones, Philip R. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The general paradigm is that monocytes are recruited to sites of inflammation and terminally differentiate into macrophages. There has been no demonstration of proliferation of peripherally-derived inflammatory macrophages under physiological conditions. Here we show that proliferation of both bone marrow-derived inflammatory and tissue-resident macrophage lineage branches is a key feature of the inflammatory process with major implications for the mechanisms underlying recovery from inflammation. Both macrophage lineage branches are dependent on M-CSF during inflammation, and thus the potential for therapeutic interventions is marked. Furthermore, these observations are independent of Th2 immunity. These studies indicate that the proliferation of distinct macrophage populations provides a general mechanism for macrophage expansion at key stages during inflammation, and separate control mechanisms are implicated.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1886
JournalNature Communications
Volume4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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