Developmental processes in face perception

Christoph D. Dahl, Malte J. Rasch, Masaki Tomonaga, Ikuma Adachi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the developmental origins of face recognition has been the goal of many studies of various approaches. Contributions of experience-expectant mechanisms (early component), like perceptual narrowing, and lifetime experience (late component) to face processing remain elusive. By investigating captive chimpanzees of varying age, a rare case of a species with lifelong exposure to non-conspecific faces at distinctive levels of experience, we can disentangle developmental components in face recognition. We found an advantage in discriminating chimpanzee above human faces in young chimpanzees, reflecting a predominant contribution of an early component that drives the perceptual system towards the conspecific morphology, and an advantage for human above chimpanzee faces in old chimpanzees, reflecting a predominant late component that shapes the perceptual system along the critical dimensions of the face exposed to. We simulate the contribution of early and late components using computational modeling and mathematically describe the underlying functions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1044
JournalScientific Reports
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 28 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Pan troglodytes
Facial Recognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Developmental processes in face perception. / Dahl, Christoph D.; Rasch, Malte J.; Tomonaga, Masaki; Adachi, Ikuma.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 3, 1044, 28.01.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dahl, Christoph D. ; Rasch, Malte J. ; Tomonaga, Masaki ; Adachi, Ikuma. / Developmental processes in face perception. In: Scientific Reports. 2013 ; Vol. 3.
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