Development and implementation of a nationwide health care quality indicator system in Taiwan

Wen Ta Chiu, Che Ming Yang, Hui Wen Lin, Tu Bin Chu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quality issues: Quality is an increasingly important issue to the health care sector. The Taiwanese government also recognizes the need to implement a nationwide health care quality indicator system to strengthen quality surveillance. Choice of solution: In 1999, the Department of Health funded a 2-year project led by the Taiwan Healthcare Executive College to develop a comprehensive performance assessment system, subsequently named as Taiwan Healthcare Indicator Series (THIS). The series includes four categories of indicators, namely outpatient, in-patient, emergency care, and intensive care, and has 139 items in total. Implementation: The system was officially launched in 2001. Participation is voluntary. The Taiwan Healthcare Executive College processes the data and provides feedback to the participating hospitals. The information is for the participating hospitals' own use and is not released to the public. Evaluation: Participating hospitals have increased from 45 in 2001 to 227 in 2006 and now constitute ∼50% of the total hospital population in Taiwan. The reporting rate averaged 77.7% in 2004. The first five most reported indicators are the percentage of first-visit outpatients to outpatient clinics, the average length of in-patient stay, the nosocomial infection rate, the occupancy rate, and the crude mortality rate. Lessons learned: How the data are interpreted and how data interpretation can lead to quality improvement are the principal concerns of participating hospitals. In light of the success of the indicator series, the Bureau of National Health Insurance (BNHI) of Taiwan has proposed participation in the series as being one of the criteria to be reimbursed for quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-28
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal for Quality in Health Care
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

Health Care Quality Indicators
Taiwan
health care
Delivery of Health Care
Outpatients
Health Care Sector
National Health Programs
Emergency Medical Services
Critical Care
Cross Infection
Quality Improvement
Ambulatory Care Facilities
outpatient clinic
participation
performance assessment
Patient Care
health insurance
surveillance
mortality
Mortality

Keywords

  • Health care indicator
  • Performance assessment
  • Quality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

Development and implementation of a nationwide health care quality indicator system in Taiwan. / Chiu, Wen Ta; Yang, Che Ming; Lin, Hui Wen; Chu, Tu Bin.

In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, Vol. 19, No. 1, 02.2007, p. 21-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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