Depression trajectories and obesity among the elderly in Taiwan

S. Y. Kuo, K. M. Lin, C. Y. Chen, Y. L. Chuang, W. J. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The present study aimed to (a) characterize 10-year trajectory patterns of depressive symptoms and (b) investigate the association between depressive trajectory and subsequent obesity, metabolic function and cortisol level.Method In a prospective study of Taiwanese adults aged 60 years (n=3922) between 1989 and 1999, depression was assessed using a 10-item short-form of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and information on body mass index (BMI) was collected by self-report. A subsample (n=445) of the original cohort in 1989 was drawn to assess metabolic variables and cortisol levels in a 2000 follow-up. After trajectory analyses were performed, multinomial logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association estimates.Results We identified four distinctive trajectories of depressive symptoms: class 1 (persistent low, 41.8%); class 2 (persistent mild, 46.8%); class 3 (late peak, 4.2%); and class 4 (high-chronic, 7.2%). The results from both complete cases and multiple imputation analyses indicated that the odds of obesity were lower in the class 2, 3 or 4 elderly, as compared with those in class 1, while the odds of underweight were higher. The classes of older adults with more and persistent depressive symptoms showed a trend toward having both a lower BMI (p=0.01) and a higher cortisol level (p=0.04) compared with those with low depressive symptoms.Conclusions Incremental increases in depressive symptoms over time were associated with reduced risk of obesity and higher cortisol levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1665-1676
Number of pages12
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume41
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Taiwan
Obesity
Depression
Hydrocortisone
Body Mass Index
Thinness
Self Report
Epidemiologic Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • cortisol levels
  • depressive symptoms
  • longitudinal studies
  • trajectory analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Depression trajectories and obesity among the elderly in Taiwan. / Kuo, S. Y.; Lin, K. M.; Chen, C. Y.; Chuang, Y. L.; Chen, W. J.

In: Psychological Medicine, Vol. 41, No. 8, 08.2011, p. 1665-1676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuo, S. Y. ; Lin, K. M. ; Chen, C. Y. ; Chuang, Y. L. ; Chen, W. J. / Depression trajectories and obesity among the elderly in Taiwan. In: Psychological Medicine. 2011 ; Vol. 41, No. 8. pp. 1665-1676.
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