Depression training in nursing homes: Lessons learned from a pilot study

Marianne Smith, Mary Ellen Stolder, Benjamin Jaggers, Megan Fang Liu, Chris Haedtke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Late-life depression is common among nursing home residents, but often is not addressed by nurses. Using a self-directed CD-based depression training program, this pilot study used mixed methods to assess feasibility issues, determine nurse perceptions of training, and evaluate depression-related outcomes among residents in usual care and training conditions. Of 58 nurses enrolled, 24 completed the training and gave it high ratings. Outcomes for 50 residents include statistically significant reductions in depression severity over time (p <0.001) among all groups. Depression training is an important vehicle to improve depression recognition and daily nursing care, but diverse factors must be addressed to assure optimal outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-102
Number of pages13
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

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Nursing Homes
Nurses
Nursing Care
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

Depression training in nursing homes : Lessons learned from a pilot study. / Smith, Marianne; Stolder, Mary Ellen; Jaggers, Benjamin; Liu, Megan Fang; Haedtke, Chris.

In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 34, No. 2, 02.2013, p. 90-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Marianne ; Stolder, Mary Ellen ; Jaggers, Benjamin ; Liu, Megan Fang ; Haedtke, Chris. / Depression training in nursing homes : Lessons learned from a pilot study. In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 2013 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 90-102.
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