Depression in older residents with stroke living in long-term care facilities

Hui Tzu Huang, Yeu Hui Chuang, Yi Hua Hsueh, Pao Chen Lin, Bih O. Lee, Ching Huey Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Stroke is the third leading cause of death in Taiwan. Poststroke older adults are often admitted to long-term care facilities. The impacts of the two concurrent life events of stroke and relocation may increase the risk of depression in stroke survivors. Depression in elderly stroke survivor residents of long-term care facilities has not been studied. Purpose: This study explores the factors associated with depression in older residents with stroke living in long-term care facilities. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used. Twenty-three institutions in southern Taiwan participated in this study, including seven nursing homes, 11 intermediate-care facilities, and five domiciliary-care facilities. Purposive sampling enrolled 111 participants who met the following inclusion criteria: 65 years or older, experienced a stroke that did not cause cognitive defects, and capable of verbal communication. Data were collected using a sociodemographic data questionnaire, Barthel's Index, and the Taiwan Geriatric Depression Scale. Results: Depression was experienced by 41 of the 111 participants (36.9%). Prevalence of depression was 45.7% in nursing homes, 36.2% in intermediate-care facilities, and 22.2% in domiciliary-care facilities. Participants living in nursing homes and intermediate-care facilities and illiterate participants with low Barthel's Index scores showed more depressive symptoms. Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Healthcare providers should conduct depression screening for elderly residents with stroke on admission to long-termcare facilities. Regular assessment andmonitoring of depressive symptoms, especially in residents with less formal education and limited physical functions, are important in nursing homes and intermediate-care facilities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-118
Number of pages8
JournalThe journal of nursing research : JNR
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Long-Term Care
Intermediate Care Facilities
Stroke
Depression
Home Care Services
Nursing Homes
Taiwan
Survivors
Physical Education and Training
Geriatrics
Health Personnel
Cause of Death
Communication

Keywords

  • Activity of daily living
  • Depression
  • Long-term care facility
  • Older resident
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Depression in older residents with stroke living in long-term care facilities. / Huang, Hui Tzu; Chuang, Yeu Hui; Hsueh, Yi Hua; Lin, Pao Chen; Lee, Bih O.; Chen, Ching Huey.

In: The journal of nursing research : JNR, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2014, p. 111-118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, Hui Tzu ; Chuang, Yeu Hui ; Hsueh, Yi Hua ; Lin, Pao Chen ; Lee, Bih O. ; Chen, Ching Huey. / Depression in older residents with stroke living in long-term care facilities. In: The journal of nursing research : JNR. 2014 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 111-118.
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