Delay of diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency in Taiwan.

H. H. Hsu, H. S. Wang, W. J. Su, S. T. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In view of the importance of early detection of growth hormone deficiency, the height and age at the first pediatric endocrinologic clinic visit of 45 patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency between January 1988 to December 1989 were retrospectively analyzed. Twenty-three patients with idiopathic GH deficiency had a median age of 13 years (range, from 3.8 to 29.9 years) at their first visit and a median height standard deviation score (SDS) of -3.87 (-2.14 to -7.93). Nineteen children with hypothalamopituitary tumors at their first visit, at a median of 2.17 years (0.42 to 7.83 years) after diagnosis of the tumor, had a median height SDS of -3.15 (-0.58 to -4.70). Three children with GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation at their first visit, at 8.17 years (1.33 to 10 years) after treatment for their malignancy, had a height SDS of -3.15 (-2.13 to -3.72). It is well known that the earlier the replacement therapy is begun in such patients, the better the prognosis is for final adult height. Regular height measurement and routine screening for shortness at school entry may overcome this delay in diagnosis. In addition, patients who have received cranial irradiation or had hypothalamopituitary tumors should be regularly measured and studied if their height velocities become subnormal. Physicians dealing with children should keep the possibility of growth hormone deficiency in mind when examining a short child.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)659-663
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi
Volume90
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1991

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Taiwan
Growth Hormone
Cranial Irradiation
Neoplasms
Ambulatory Care
Secondary Prevention
Pediatrics
Physicians
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Delay of diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency in Taiwan. / Hsu, H. H.; Wang, H. S.; Su, W. J.; Lin, S. T.

In: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi, Vol. 90, No. 7, 07.1991, p. 659-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hsu, H. H. ; Wang, H. S. ; Su, W. J. ; Lin, S. T. / Delay of diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency in Taiwan. In: Journal of the Formosan Medical Association = Taiwan yi zhi. 1991 ; Vol. 90, No. 7. pp. 659-663.
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