Delay in seeking medical evaluations and predictors of self-efficacy among women with newly diagnosed breast cancer

A longitudinal study

Hsiu Ju Chang, Wen Xiang Chen, Esther Ching Lan Lin, Yuk Ying Tung, Susan Fetzer, Mei Feng Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Delaying a diagnosis of breast cancer directly and positively impacts survival. Self-efficacy has been shown to be a causal mechanism in a wide range of health behaviors, a measurable trait that predicts behavior across domains, which is strong associated with psychological variables. However, factors predicting self-efficacy of women with suspected breast cancer who delayed or did not delay seeking a breast cancer diagnosis over time have not been identified. Objectives: To examine the differences between women who delay and women who did not delay seeking a cancer diagnosis, and key factors predicting self-efficacy over time among women with newly-diagnosed breast cancer. Design: Descriptive, longitudinal design over 2 months following breast cancer diagnostic evaluation. Setting: A medical center is located in southern Taiwan. Participants: Eighty women with suspected breast cancer were approached and 67 subjects with a positive diagnosis of breast cancer were recruited. Methods: Subjects were categorized into women who delayed their diagnosis and women who did not delay their diagnosis. A battery of 5 standardized questionnaires including self-efficacy, anxiety and depression, personality, spiritual support and hope was completed at the first three clinic visits. Results: Stage of cancer, trait extroversion/neuroticism and spiritual support were significantly different between groups (p

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1036-1047
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Nursing Studies
Volume51
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
Longitudinal Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Hope
Delayed Diagnosis
Health Behavior
Ambulatory Care
Taiwan
Personality
Neoplasms
Anxiety
Depression
Psychology
Survival

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Longitudinal study
  • Patient delay
  • Psychological distress
  • Self-efficacy
  • Spiritual support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Delay in seeking medical evaluations and predictors of self-efficacy among women with newly diagnosed breast cancer : A longitudinal study. / Chang, Hsiu Ju; Chen, Wen Xiang; Lin, Esther Ching Lan; Tung, Yuk Ying; Fetzer, Susan; Lin, Mei Feng.

In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, Vol. 51, No. 7, 2014, p. 1036-1047.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, Hsiu Ju ; Chen, Wen Xiang ; Lin, Esther Ching Lan ; Tung, Yuk Ying ; Fetzer, Susan ; Lin, Mei Feng. / Delay in seeking medical evaluations and predictors of self-efficacy among women with newly diagnosed breast cancer : A longitudinal study. In: International Journal of Nursing Studies. 2014 ; Vol. 51, No. 7. pp. 1036-1047.
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