Daytime sleepiness is independently associated with falls in older adults with dementia

Pin Yuan Chen, Hsiao Ting Chiu, Hsiao Yean Chiu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To examine whether elderly people with dementia have a higher prevalence of falls and sleep disturbances than those without dementia, and to determine the subjective sleep characteristics associated with falls in older adults with dementia. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, population-based study derived from the data in the 2009 Taiwan National Health Interview Survey. A total of 123 older adults with dementia (aged 65 years or older), and 246 older adults without dementia who were randomly selected from the database were included. The occurrence of falls and subjective sleep characteristics (e.g. sleep hours, insomnia symptoms, daytime sleepiness, difficulty in breathing during sleep and daytime naps) were evaluated using the responses to the survey questions. Results: The prevalence of falls in older adults with dementia were approximately twofold higher than that for those without dementia (27.6% vs 15.3%, P = 0.006). Older adults with dementia had longer sleep hours, and increased daytime sleepiness, daytime naps and difficulty in breathing during sleep (all P < 0.05) than those without dementia. Among older adults with dementia, daytime sleepiness was the only sleep characteristic that was significantly correlated to an increased risk of falls (adjusted odds ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 1.95–15.91) despite controlling for possible risk factors. Conclusions: Older adults with dementia had a higher prevalence of falls and sleep disturbances than that observed for those without dementia. Daytime sleepiness was an independent risk factor of falls in elderly people, with dementia after accounting for a range of covariates. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 850–855.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)850-855
Number of pages6
JournalGeriatrics and Gerontology International
Volume16
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

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dementia
Dementia
sleep
Sleep
Respiration
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Health Surveys
Taiwan
confidence
Odds Ratio
Databases
Confidence Intervals
Interviews

Keywords

  • daytime sleepiness
  • dementia
  • elderly
  • falls
  • sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Daytime sleepiness is independently associated with falls in older adults with dementia. / Chen, Pin Yuan; Chiu, Hsiao Ting; Chiu, Hsiao Yean.

In: Geriatrics and Gerontology International, Vol. 16, No. 7, 01.07.2016, p. 850-855.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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