Cytogenetic studies in subgroups of rhabdomyosarcoma

J. Whang‐Peng, T. Knutsen, K. Theil, M. E. Horowitz, T. Triche

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and accounts for 10% of all solid tumors in children. There are three different histologic forms of this tumor: embryonal (RMS‐E), alveolar (RMS‐A), and primitive (RMS‐P). Among these, the embryonal form has responded well to chemotherapy. Identification of the correct subtype is important for both the management and treatment of this malignancy. However, the histopathologic classification of RMS is sometimes difficult and distinguishing between the embryonic and primitive forms can present a diagnostic dilemma. Chromosomal abnormalities have been observed in all subtypes. We present the cytogenetic findings in six cases of RMS or related sarcoma. All four cases with RMS‐A had both numerical and structural abnormalities in the tumor and involved bone marrow specimens. Three patients had a common marker, t(2;13)(q37;q14), and one patient had a variant marker involving 13q14, t(1;13) (p36;q14), and double minutes (dmin). The single embryonal RMS patient had modal chromosome numbers in the hypertriploid range and extensive structural abnormalities; the t(2; 13) was not present, but translocation of 13q to both I q and 2p was observed, der(l)t(l;l3)(q21;q14) and der(2)t(2;13)(p25;q14). The patient with primitive type RMS had a hypodipl‐oid line with several markers, including a complex translocation involving chromosomes 5 and 13 with a breakpoint at 13q14, and t( 11;22)(q24;q 12), a chromosome marker heretofore found only in Ewing's sarcoma and related tumors. This patient had atypical RMS with mixed neural and myogenic elements. The significance of these chromosomal markers and their importance in the characterization of childhood tumors are discussed, along with a review of the literature. Published 1992 by Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-310
Number of pages12
JournalGenes, Chromosomes and Cancer
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Rhabdomyosarcoma
Cytogenetics
Neoplasms
Sarcoma
Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 13
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 5
Ewing's Sarcoma
Genetic Markers
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes
Bone Marrow
Drug Therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Cytogenetic studies in subgroups of rhabdomyosarcoma. / Whang‐Peng, J.; Knutsen, T.; Theil, K.; Horowitz, M. E.; Triche, T.

In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.01.1992, p. 299-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whang‐Peng, J. ; Knutsen, T. ; Theil, K. ; Horowitz, M. E. ; Triche, T. / Cytogenetic studies in subgroups of rhabdomyosarcoma. In: Genes, Chromosomes and Cancer. 1992 ; Vol. 5, No. 4. pp. 299-310.
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