CXC chemokine ligand-13 promotes metastasis via CXCR5-dependent signaling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer

Chia Chia Chao, Wei Fang Lee, Shih Wei Wang, Po Chun Chen, Ayaho Yamamoto, Tsung Ming Chang, Shun Long Weng, Ju Fang Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The CXC chemokine ligand-13 (CXCL13) is a chemoattractant of B cells and has been implicated in the progression of many cancers. So far, CXCL13 and its related receptor CXCR5 have been proved to regulate cancer cell migration as well as tumour metastasis. However, the role of CXCL13-CXCR5 axis in metastasis of lung cancer is still poorly understood. In this study, we found that CXCL13 and CXCR5 were commonly up-regulated in lung cancer specimens compared with normal tissues among different cohorts. Our evidence showed that CXCL13 obviously promoted migration of lung cancer cells, and this effect was mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expression. We also confirmed that CXCR5, the major receptor responsible for CXCL13 function, was required for CXCL13-promoted cell migration. We also test the candidate components which are activated after CXCL13 treatment and found that phospholipase C-β (PLCβ), protein kinase C-α (PKCα) and c-Src signalling pathways were involved in CXCL13-promoted cell migration and VCAM-1 expression in lung cancer cells. Finally, CXCL13 stimulated NF-κB transcription factor in lung cancer cells, contributing to VCAM-1 expression in translational level. These evidences propose a novel insight into lung cancer metastasis which is regulated by CXCL13.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9128-9140
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Volume25
Issue number19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • CXCL13
  • CXCR5
  • lung cancer
  • metastasis
  • VCAM-1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Cell Biology

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