Cryptococcosis in Nonhuman Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children

Kuan Ying Huang, Yhu Chering Huang, Iou Jih Hung, Tzou Yien Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between 1991-2006, nine patients below age 18 years, with a microbiologic documentation of Cryptococcus neoformans infection and no evidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection, were identified and treated at Chang Gung Children's Hospital. All exhibited central nervous system involvement. Seven patients were female (age range, 9-16 years; mean age, 13.7 years). Five patients (56%) manifested underlying diseases and were receiving either steroid or immunosuppressant treatment at time of disease onset. Eight patients presented with meningitis. Headache, vomiting, and focal neurologic signs were the most common presentations. Protein and sugar levels in cerebrospinal fluid were within normal range in seven cases, whereas India ink smear and cryptococcal antigen testing were positive in 87% (7/8) and 78% (7/9) of patients, respectively. With prompt antifungal therapy, all survived, but one presented the sequel of blindness. Cryptococcosis is uncommon in the nonhuman immunodeficiency virus-infected pediatric population. Clinicians should take into account a diagnosis of central nervous system cryptococcosis when children present with prolonged headache, vomiting, and focal neurologic signs. Indian ink stain and cryptococcal antigen testing of cerebrospinal fluid should be performed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-270
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Neurology
Volume42
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cryptococcosis
Viruses
Neurologic Manifestations
Vomiting
Headache
Cerebrospinal Fluid
Central Nervous System
Antigens
Ink
Cryptococcus neoformans
Virus Diseases
Blindness
Immunosuppressive Agents
Meningitis
Documentation
Reference Values
Coloring Agents
Steroids
HIV
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neurology

Cite this

Cryptococcosis in Nonhuman Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children. / Huang, Kuan Ying; Huang, Yhu Chering; Hung, Iou Jih; Lin, Tzou Yien.

In: Pediatric Neurology, Vol. 42, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 267-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Huang, Kuan Ying ; Huang, Yhu Chering ; Hung, Iou Jih ; Lin, Tzou Yien. / Cryptococcosis in Nonhuman Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children. In: Pediatric Neurology. 2010 ; Vol. 42, No. 4. pp. 267-270.
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