Critical airway compromise caused by neck haematoma

I J Keogh, H Rowley, J Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The recognition and treatment of the compromised airway needs to be quick and systematic. Airway obstruction, can rapidly progresses to anoxia irreversible cerebral damage and death, within four to five minutes. Management of the unstable airway has the highest treatment priority regardless of the presence of other medical conditions. We report the clinical course of minor anterior neck injury in two elderly patients taking oral anticoagulants. Both patients developed sudden airway obstruction, due to circumferential neck haematoma; six to eight hours post injury. The rapid neck swelling caused upper airway compression and rapid desaturation. Both patients required urgent orotracheal intubation in the emergency room. Patients with a history of blunt neck trauma may initially appear stable, then quickly decompensate and require an emergency airway.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-5
Number of pages2
JournalClinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences
Volume27
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hematoma
Neck
Airway Obstruction
Neck Injuries
Brain Hypoxia
Airway Management
Wounds and Injuries
Intubation
Anticoagulants
Hospital Emergency Service
Emergencies
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Airway Obstruction/diagnosis
  • Anticoagulants/adverse effects
  • Hematoma/chemically induced
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Neck Injuries/complications

Cite this

Critical airway compromise caused by neck haematoma. / Keogh, I J; Rowley, H; Russell, J.

In: Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences, Vol. 27, No. 4, 08.2002, p. 244-5.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keogh, I J ; Rowley, H ; Russell, J. / Critical airway compromise caused by neck haematoma. In: Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences. 2002 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 244-5.
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